'He's he's the little man I was engaged to, she said. 'But I made him break it off. I told him 'twas no good. But he won't, yo' see. 'That fellow? Why, he doesn't come up to your shoulder. 'That's naught to do with it. I think all the world of him. I'm a foolish wench' her speech wandered as she settled herself cosily, one elbow on the arm-rest.

"Dreckly Brer Rabbit hear um callin' 'im ag'in en off he goes, en dis time, bless yo' soul, he gits de butter out so clean dat he kin see hisse'f in de bottom er de bucket. He scrape it clean en lick it dry, en den he go back ter wuk lookin' mo' samer dan a nigger w'at de patter-rollers bin had holt un. "'How's yo' ole 'oman dis time? sez Brer Fox, sezee.

He hadn't been there long when Unc' Billy Possum came shuffling along, just as if he was out walking for his health. "Howdy, Mistah Buzzard! Ah cert'nly hopes yo'all feel right smart," said Unc' Billy. Ol' Mistah Buzzard's eyes twinkled as he replied: "Ah feel right pert, Brer Possum, thank yo'. Ah hopes yo' feel the same. Yo' look like nothing ever bothers yo'."

"Mist' Curry, you been mighty good to me, one way'n anotheh, an' I'd like to ast yo' fo' some advice." "Well," said the old man, "advice is like medicine, Gabe easy to give but hard to take. What's troublin' you now?" "Mist' Curry, yo' 'membeh me tellin' yo' 'bout that Gen'al Duval colt of mine how he neveh did look the same to me since I got him?"

"Well, she's a fool if she doesn't want to, an' I'll say it to her face. If thar's a better lookin' man around here, I'd like to see him, or a better worker. What have the Merryweathers to be so set up about, I'd like to know? And that gal without even a father to her name that she can call her own!" "You mustn't I won't stand it any longer." "Well, it's for yo' good, I reckon.

The Shanghai rooster settled down with a half-stifled squawk in the bottom of his coop. Without doubt the bird saw the bear and realized that his life was in peril. "What de matter wid yo'?" demanded Washington, rolling his eyes and beginning to look scared himself. Jack's mouth was dry and he had to wet his lips before he could as much as whisper.

What could have happened? When dusk was falling, Captain Wells dispatched a messenger to Lieutenant Skaggs and his reserve, and got an answer; Lieutenant Skaggs feared that Boggs had been captured without the firing of a single shot but the flag was floating still. An hour later, Lieutenant Skaggs sent another message he could not see the flag. Captain Wells answered, stoutly: "Hold yo' own."

"Many a time, Jack, many a time when the paper 'ud be full of yo' holdin' up a train or shootin' a shar'ff, or robbin' or killin', I'd tell 'em what a good boy you had been, brave an' game but revengeful when aroused.

Yo' try to stop all our pleasures ebenings, an' dar's gwine be a strike -shuah!" "You may strike right now, if you wish to," Tom retorted, facing the last speaker. "Mr. Renshaw will be prepared to pay you off within hour. Any other man in this camp who isn't content to get along without liquor and gambling may as well strike at the same time. Mr. Renshaw, it's half-past eight.

She spoke something low, stroking her downy fan and blushing with that damsel sweetness of which her husband was so openly fond. "O no, I sank you!" answered Senda, in an undulating voice. "I sank you v'ey much, but I cannot take se time to come to yo' house, and I cannot let you take se trouble too come too mine.