'Lo'd have mercy on me, a sinner! 'Be merciful to poor me, or I'm lost. These cries we hear'n from every side. I never felt happier or bolder in my life, while tears of joy ran down as I faced my ole massa. He slam de door shut, an' da said he jumped between two feather-beds to keep from hearin' de cries of de people.

'N' she give me the ole mare, 'n' nine dollars all we had. The mawnin' I left," his voice slipped back into the whispery accents, "she put her arms 'round my neck, 'n' asked me ter make her one promise." "What was that promise? Can you tell me?" "Hit war jest somethin'," he hesitated, flushing.

Earl Hakon knew nothing of the strong feelings that were rising against him, nor did he doubt that he should enjoy his power unmolested to the end of his days. One thought alone disturbed his sense of security. It chanced that rumours had reached him concerning a certain viking who called himself Ole, and who was said to have won great renown in the realm of King Ethelred.

"Well," said Curly, ruminatingly, "I don't see as ole Carrizo is frettin' any about these here things." He glanced up at the big mountain whose shadow lay athwart the valley. Dan Anderson gazed thither as well. McKinney sat looking quietly up the street. "No use frettin' about it, anyhow," said he, in his matter-of-fact way.

'Look here, I says to the waiter, 'THESE must be'n left over f'm ole Jeanne d'Arc herself, I says. 'Talk about yer relics, I says. Whoosh! I'd like t' died!" He laughed violently, and concluded by turning upon me with a contemptuous flourish of his stick. "You think I d'know what makes YOU so raw?"

However, I wasn't goin' to be beat by that cove, so I say to 'im, Jack, I says, I planted it so a purpus, an' w'en it sprouts I'm a-goin' to 'ang it up to see if it won't grow through the 'ole in the bottom. In the second place, I couldn't retain the sitivation 'cause I don't intend to take it, though you was to offer me six thousand no shillin's an' no pence no farthin's a year as salary.

She felt the cold, too, in spite of her fat, and as the proverb says: It's easier for two to keep warm than one; but whatever was her reason for doing it, Long Ole might thank his Maker for her. There was always bacon hanging in her chimney. Lasse and Pelle looked forward to term-day with anxiety. What changes would it bring this time for people? So much depended on that.

Gyuard Oh, Lawd, Lawd, de days I's held dat chile out on one o' dese ole han's!" He had Flora's feeling for stage effects. Toiling or resting, the Southern slaves were singers.

"Sure a gun's good enough for me," then, "Ole Caleb been around since?" "Old Caleb? I should say so; why, he's our stiddy company." "'Pears fonder o'you than he is of me." "Say, Da, tell us about that. How do you know it was Caleb shot at you?" "Oh, I don't know it to prove it in a coort o' law, but we quarr'led that day in town after the Horse trade an' he swore he'd fix me an' left town.

Pelle had heard the same thing often before from his father, from Ole and Anders, from Karna and a hundred others who had been there.