"'Scuse me, Massa Jack," answered the colored man, "but did I done heah you' to promulgate some conversationess regarding de transmigatorability ob diamonds?" "Do you mean, were we talking about diamonds?" inquired Mark. "Dat's what I done said, Massa Mark." "No, you didn't say it, but you meant it, I guess," went on Jack. "Yes, we were talking about diamonds, Washington.

"Look here, Massa Shobbrok. We get some bits of board.

No sooner was Boxer safe inside the room, than Peter began hurriedly to close the shutter, when we heard the report of a gun, and a bullet with a loud thud struck it. Fortunately the wood was thick, or one of us might have been shot. Peter, quick as lightning, closed the shutter and put up the bar. "Dem rascally Kentuckians do dat!" he exclaimed; "hand me your rifle, massa, and me pay dem back.

"Massa do somefin for Han?" he said. "My poor fellow, only speak," said my father, who was much moved, while I felt choking. "If Han die, massa be kind to Pomp?" "No," cried the boy, with a passionate burst of grief, "Pomp die too." "And Massa George be good to um." "Oh, Han," I cried, in a broken voice, as I knelt on the opposite side to my father, and held the poor fellow's other hand.

"No, Massy Easy you break your leg den captain leave you shore, and leave me to take care of you." "But why should I break my leg, and how am I to break my leg?" "Only pretend break leg, Massa Easy. Go talk Massa Don Philip, he manage all dat. Suppose man break his leg in seven pieces, it is not possible to take him board." "Seven pieces, Mesty! that's rather too many.

"What de matter now, massa?" said Jup, evidently shamed into compliance; "always want for to raise fuss wid old nigger. Was only funnin any how. Me feered de bug! what I keer for de bug?" Here he took cautiously hold of the extreme end of the string, and, maintaining the insect as far from his person as circumstances would permit, prepared to ascend the tree.

"Very true, Ned; let's pull up, and give them their wind." "By de holy poker, Massa Easy, but my shirt stick to my ribs," cried Mesty, whose black face was hung with dewdrops from their rapid course. "Never mind, Mesty." It was about five o'clock in the afternoon when they arrived at the seat of Don Rebiera.

"I was very much frightened for you, Mesty," said Jack; "but still I thought you quite as cunning as the friar, and so it has turned out; but the thousand dollars ought to be yours." "No, sar," replied Mesty, "the dollars not mine; but I hab plenty of gold in Don Silvio's purse plenty, plenty of gold. I keep my property, Massa Easy, and you keep yours."

Ugh!" he said to the Captain, "sight o' them fellows just took my appetite away; couldn't eat to save my soul; lucky they came to devour the rations; pity to throw them away." The Captain smiled, he knew Jim. "Poor cusses!" he added presently, "eat like cannibals, don't they? hope they enjoy it. Had enough?" seeing they had devoured everything put before them. "Thankee, massa. Yes, massa.

I hope, Moses, that you aimed low." "Yes, massa but it's sca'cely fair when life an' def am in de balance to expect me to hit 'im on de legs on a dark night. Legs is a bad targit. Bullet's apt to pass between 'em. Howseber, dat feller won't hop much for some time to come!"