"No stay long 'nough in there to get much hungry," Smilax shook his head. "One night and they pull um down and got us. Good to keep 'em off in daytime; after dark we run in grass." There was something in what he said. With the approach of evening a curious calm came over me.

"I wonder," I began to think out aloud, "whether you mean that I say what comes into my mind without being afraid you mayn't like it?" "Er um perhaps that covers a good deal of the ground. But what put the idea into your head? Why should you be afraid of me?" "I'm not. Only I've thought that it would be more respectful if I were. You are so celebrated, you see.

He did just what I would have done if I'd seen that brick first." But when Whimple asked for the cause of the battered visage, William merely answered that he had collided with a brick. "Was the brick hurt any?" "Well, not so's you'd notice it," retorted William smilingly. "Um! It's rather unfortunate that it was such a hard object for you, I mean," said Whimple.

He lifts the hood, and behold the crown. He raises the crutch, and lo! the rod of power. He drops the scythe of death for the jewel of eternal life. "Om Mani Padme Um." O child of Adam! Meditate on the transmutations of life. Behold the earthly miracle of the caterpillar and the butterfly, of the toiling mortal and the transcendent God! Uranus

"There, p'r'aps it isn't much hurt," and she took the broken one, and began to smooth it out. "But it's bursted," cried Joel, trying to look through the rain of tears. "Oh, Polly! I was going to make the hole when I jumped through." "Um! " said Polly, busily considering.

"Never more will he butt alike the just and the unjust, the fat and bloated German merchant nor the herring-gutted Yankee skipper, nor the bare ah um legged Samoan, nor the gorgeous consul in the solar topee. Gone is the glory of Samoa with Billy MacLaggan.

"I thought of her. I have grown to be her devoted slave, and I hoped she liked me." "You put it mildly," said Mr. Pryor. "Since you didn't come when she expected you, we've had the worst time with her that we have had since we reached this da ah er um this country." "Could you make any suggestion?" asked Laddie. "I could!

"Doesn't seem to want anything particular," replies the other. "It's a curious sort of train. Seems to be a bit dotty, if you ask me." "Um," muses the station-master, "it's a rum go. Well, I suppose we must let it stop here a bit now. We can hardly turn it out a night like this. Oh, let it make itself comfortable in the wood-shed till the morning, and then we will see if we can find its friends."

Finally, he gave vent to a long-drawn 'Um-m-m, in a deep bass. 'Most extraordinary. Really, most extraordinary. Exceedingly. Yes. Um. Very. He took a sip of coffee. 'My dear, said he, suddenly. Mrs Perceval started violently. She had been sketching out in her mind a little dinner, and wondering whether the cook would be equal to it. 'Yes, she said.

As he drew near the little group on the steps, Louise courteously rose to greet him. "Come in, Dr. Hornblower," she said hospitably. "Walk into the parlor, and I'll call Mrs. Pennypoker." The doctor paused irresolutely, while he looked up into her fair young face. "Um thank you," he said awkwardly. "I will at least I didn't exactly come to see Mrs. Pennypoker, this afternoon.