At six o'clock Bass came in, and seeing the nervous assembly in the kitchen, inquired what the trouble was. Gerhardt looked at him grimly, but did not answer. "What's the trouble?" insisted Bass. "What are you all sitting around for?" "He is driving Jennie away," whispered Mrs. Gerhardt tearfully. "What for?" asked Bass, opening his eyes in astonishment.

And presently, after having got her boat again, she came before the wind and was headed directly for the Bass. This was very troublesome to Andie and the Highlanders; the whole business of my sequestration was designed for privacy, and here, with a navy captain perhaps blundering ashore, it looked to become public enough, if it were nothing worse.

He spoke with such sonorous cordiality, that the china and glass ornaments on Lucilla's chiffonier actually jingled an accompaniment to his booming bass notes. "Come to tea, my dear sir. Without ceremony. To-night at six. We must keep up your spirits, Mr. Dubourg. Cheerful society, and a little music. Lucilla, my dear child, you will play for Mr. Dubourg, won't you?

Henry Brown failed, an' we found that he had borrowed five hundred dollars from John Bass, an' at the same time John Bass had borrowed six hundred from Tom Rogers, an' Rogers had borrowed seven hundred an' fifty from Sam Henshaw, an' Henshaw had borrowed the same amount from Percival Smith, an' Smith had got it from me.

"I've just finished cramming a month into four days and I got a night off coming." Instantly his snoring began but it was some moments before anyone spoke. Then it was Little Joe in his solemn bass voice. "Sounds man-sized," he declared. "Wears a bullet for a watch-fob, busts hosses for fun, sleeps one day a week, and don't work under a boss.

Many and loud were the coarse jokes cracked at the expense of Bass and Miller and after the rude door had closed upon them similar remarks were addressed to Steele's jailer and guard, who in truth, were just as disreputable looking as their prisoners. Then the crowd returned to their pastimes, leaving their erstwhile comrades to taste the sweets of prison life.

"Ah, bass!" murmured Cathewe from behind his journal. "By the way, Hewitt," said Fitzgerald, "have you ever heard of a chap called Karl Breitmann?" "Yes," answered Hewitt. "Never met him personally, though." "I have," joined in Cathewe quietly. He laid down the Times. "What do you know about him?" "Met him in Paris last year. Met him once before in Macedonia. Dined with me in Paris.

They lie on the further side of the Canyon, and are seen more distinctly from Bass Camp. Hotouta Amphitheatre. When fifteen miles from El Tovar, the first gaze into the Canyon is afforded at Hotouta Amphitheatre, a deep indentation in the walls of the south rim. The road here runs close to the rim. This amphitheatre receives its name from Hotouta, the son of Navaho, the last great Havasupai chief.

"We callated we'd wait and see what steps you'd like taken," said the trembling townsman. "Steps! Steps! Good God! What kind of man are you to serve in such a place when you allow the professed ward of Jethro Bass of Jethro Bass, the most notoriously depraved man in this state, to teach the children of this town. Steps! How soon can you call your committee together?" "Right away," answered Mr.

This gentleman, issuing from his carriage with his card-case ready in his hand, met Amelius at the door, with a face which announced plainly that a catastrophe had happened. "You have heard the sad news, no doubt?" he said, in a rich bass voice attuned to sadly courteous tones. The servant opened the door before Amelius could answer.