"I'll jine!" exclaimed a man. There was a pause. "And me," said the negro. I was glad of this, and looked earnestly at the others. "Is she tight?" said a man. "As a bottle," said I. They fell silent again. "Joe Wilkinson and Washington Cromwell them two jines," said the captain. "Bullies, he wants a third. Don't speak all together."

"Your servant, Sir," said Joe, "which I hope as you and Pip" here his eye fell on the Avenger, who was putting some toast on table, and so plainly denoted an intention to make that young gentleman one of the family, that I frowned it down and confused him more "I meantersay, you two gentlemen, which I hope as you get your elths in this close spot?

"Not for five per cent.," declared Hardenberg. "How'd we raise her? How'd we know how deep she lies? Not for Joe. What's the matter with landing arms down here in Central America for Bocas and his gang?" "I'm out o' that, Joe. Too much competition." "What's doing here in Tahiti No. 88? It ain't lettered." Once more the President consulted his books. "Ah! 88. Here we are. Cache o' illicit pearls.

His wife and only child had just started for a visit to England where she was born. The next day we rode the range to see Joe's cattle, and the next we started out for a little hunt. It was sitting by a jolly camp-fire, back in the hills of New Mexico, that "Mormon Joe" told me the true story of the robbery of the Black Prince mine and the romance of his life.

"Joe," stammered Slippery, when he again found his voice that from sheer fright failed him for some moments, "boy, you have saved my life and come what may I shall stay and work with you and then after we have made a 'stake' we will go to Rugby and I shall buy a farm and make my home near your home and finish my days in peace and plenty."

"Beautiful Isle of the Sea!" When we said, "Let us go to Mt. Desert," Joe gave us Punch's advice on marriage: "Don't!" Sue said. "It has lost half its charms by becoming so fashionable;" and Hal added, as an unanswerable argument, "You'll not be able to get enough to eat."

She moaned as though the man had beat her again. "Six months!" rasped out the magistrate between his teeth. "And I'm going to put you under a peace bond when you get out. Little woman, you're dismissed." Joe was roughly jostled out into the detention room again by the rosy-cheeked policeman, whose face was neither so jolly nor rosy now.

The smoke had found the low places in garden and lawn, where it hovered; a dove wailed from the old orchard, where a pair of them nested year after year; a little child-wind came with soft fingers, and laid them on the waiting woman's hair. Her face quickened with a smile. Joe was coming home from the field.

"I thought perhaps, since you are going away, you would let me keep Reginald. He'd be something to remember you by." "One would think I was about to die! I set Reginald free that day in the country. I'm sorry, Joe. You'll come to see me now and then, won't you?" "If I do, do you think you may change your mind?" "I'm afraid not."

The minute before he was in high spirits his prospects seemed excellent and his path bright. "What shall I do?" he ejaculated. "I can't tell you," said the officer. "One thing is clear you can't go to California on that ticket." Poor Joe! For the moment hope was dead within his breast.