"Somethin' that's already did?" "Yes, 'm" still lower. "Did you think you was actin' fer the best?" The girl lifted a pair of honest gray eyes. "Yes, ma'am, I did." "I bet you did!" said Mrs. Wiggs, heartily. "You ain't got a deceivin' bone in yer body. Now what you want to do is to brace up yer sperrits.

"To tell you the truth, I aren't quite done thinkin' about it yet. Mad? The man was a dumb lunatic must 'ave been for months years p'raps. I know somethin' o' maniacs, as every man in the Service must. I've been shipmates with a mad skipper an' a lunatic Number One, but never both together I thank 'Eaven.

I had the good luck to unearth at Dry Valley the man who had written threatenin' letters to my uncle an' to discover that he was stayin' next door to the Paradox the very night of the murder. More, my friend Sanborn an' I guessed he had actually been on the fire escape of the Wyndham an' seen somethin' of importance through the window. Later I forced a statement from Olson.

"Andy," sobbed Tess, "I air goin' to tell ye somethin'; ye may think I air awful wicked, but but Andy, don't tell Daddy, but in the spring I air goin' to " "Yep, I know, Tess," he murmured. "I heard the woman yellin' at ye the uther day way through my blankets. But 'tain't nothin' to cry over. God'll bless ye, brat, and God'll bless it!"

"Oh! I say, 'Ockins," whispered Ebony at this point, "my mout's a-waterin'." "Well, mine's somethin' in the same way," returned the seaman, "but we haven't a rap to buy with."

There won't be no war unless somebody starts somethin'. Hey, there, buddy, would ye smoke a God's-country cigarette if I give ye one?" "Si," grinned the soldier-policeman, all animosity gone. And as the other two men tramped away through the mud they also grinned, looking back at the North and the South American pacing side by side in sentry-go, blowing smoke and conversing like brothers in arms.

"Ma's steamin' about somethin'," remarked Andy as he entered the bunk-house. This information was received with characteristic silence as each and every cowboy mentally straightened up, vowing silently that he wasn't goin' to take any chances of Ma b'ilin' over on him.

For a second she positively grinned, then quickly her face regained its customary calm. With a clever, if slightly tardy, movement, her hand went up to her throat. "Yes, sir shoor, it's mine! Now what do you think of that! Me losin' somethin' I think the world an' all of, an' have wore for, I do' know how long, an' never missin' it!" Mr. Ronald's eyes shot out a quick, quizzical gleam.

I had been promisin' all summer to go, and every time I saw Mis' Fulham, Sundays, she 'd say somethin' about it. We wa'n't very well acquainted, but always friendly. She moved here from Bedford Hill." "Oh, yes; I used to know her," said Abby, with interest. "Well, now, she did give me a beautiful welcome when I got there," continued Mrs. Hand.

"And there was somethin' else wonderful happened," the boy declared. And told about Edith Cavell. "She was jus' like she was alive! All in white. And white hair. Only I couldn't see where she'd been hit by the bullets." "No, dear old fellow," returned Mr. Perkins. "That wasn't Edith Cavell. That was the trained nurse, or maybe a Sister of Mercy anyhow, some one who was waiting on the Father."