"John Corliss." "Gee Gosh! I knowed when I et that rabbit this mornin' that somethin' was goin' to happen. Thought it was po'try, but I was mistook." "So you ate your half of the rabbit this morning, eh?" "Sure!! " "And you gave me the rest. You sure are loco." "Mebby I be. Anyhow, I'm used to bein' hungry. They ain't so much of me to keep as you crossways, I mean. Of course, up and down "

They were no sooner seated on the rude bench than Ralph began: "I ought to 'a' told you before, I done very wrong not to tell you, but I couldn't raise the courage to do it till this mornin'. Here's what I want you to know."

"He either doesn't understand what that means, or else is trying to seem ignorant," was what Paul thought, seeing this expression of wonderment. "I'm glad to hear that, sure I am, Mr. Rollins," the other remarked, slowly, "an' seein' as how you're dropped in on us unexpected like, p'raps I ought to tell you what I meant to say in the mornin." "What's that?" demanded Mr.

We'll lay 'round here till mornin' and then set a signal. Something'll come along pretty soon. Sure 'nough, 'long come a coaler bound for Charleston. She see us a-wallowin' in the trough and our mast thrashin' for all it was worth. "'What d'ye want? the skipper says, when he got within hail.

The wind appeared to be steadily increasing. The day was Sunday, October 18th. Presently George sat up, rubbed his eyes and gazed about him for a moment in bewilderment. "Mornin', Wallace," he said, when he had collected his senses, "that blamed rain will make the travellin' hard, won't it?"

"About Ruth." The wild gleam in Hamlin's eyes began to dull. However, he was still suspicious. "You seen any of your men this mornin' Davies or Harris?" he asked. "Davies and Harris went to town last night. I reckon they didn't get back yet. What's Davies and Harris got to do with me visiting you?" "Nothin'." There was relief in Hamlin's voice.

"You won't think I'm a vain old woman if I tell you?" "Why, certainly not. Tell me." "Well well I was thinkin' this mornin' when I dressed that I didn't seem to fit in with the house. When I saw my pretty gray room, all so light and and beautiful and when I saw myself in the lookin'-glass with my old black dress, I thought I wished " "Yes, Miss Doane; what did you wish?"

Therefor, he began his reply: Dere Miss Maria Klegg: "I talk mi pen in hand to inform you that our walkin'-papers has at last come, and we start termorrer mornin' for Buzzard Roost to settle jest whose to rool that roost. Our ideas and Mister Jo Johnston's differ on that subjeck. When we git through with him hele no more, though he probably won't be so purty as he is now."

We drawed into the ranch near midnight, but next mornin' Tim had a long talk with the boss, and the result was that the whole outfit was instructed to arm up with a pick or a shovel apiece, and to get set for Texas Pete's. We got there a little after noon, turned the old boy out without firearms and then began to dig at a place Tim told us to, near that grave of Texas Pete's.

"And I was noticin' in the mornin' paper how the Countess had decided to drop them suits." "What?" says Hallam, starin' at him. "Where was that? On the front page?" "No," says Riggs. "It was a little item on the inside mixed up with the obituary notes. That's always the way. They start you on the front page, and then " Private Ben shrugs his shoulders.