"I told the President about it, Uncle Jethro; I told him how sick Cousin Eph had been, and that you were going to give him the postmastership because he couldn't work any more with his hands." The training of a lifetime had schooled Jethro not to betray surprise. "K-kind of mixin' up in politics, hain't you, Cynthy? P-President say he'd give you the postmastership, Eph?" he asked.

"I won't stay penned up 'way out there in the country another day. I've got a right to live. I've got a right to see folks and to go places, and to to live!" "To be sure.... To be sure. Jest itchin' to kick the top bar off'n the pasture fence. Most certain you got a right to live, and nobody hain't goin' to hender you ... least of all me.

The agent was forced to mop his forehead with his sleeve. "Say, hain't got a cooky or anything, and a cup o' milk handy?" he said at the end of the first enormous word, which ran the whole length of the barn. Uncle Ethan got him the milk and cooky, which he ate with an exaggeratedly dainty action of his fingers, seated meanwhile on the staging which Uncle Ripley had helped him to build.

He's great on gettin' his pay, Andy is." "He ought to have made a mean man," said the other, thoughtfully. "Well, he hain't, not so to speak," said Uncle William, slowly. "There's mean spots rocks; you hev to steer some, but it's sandy bottom if you know how to make it. I've anchored on him a good many year now and I never knew him to slip anchor. It may drift a little now and then.

"You see," said the good woman, as she and Mildred were hidden from view in a china closet, "I could get hup quite a grand dinner, but I hain't much use fur these 'ere things, for he heats less and less hevery day. I'm troubled habout Mr. Roger, fur he seems kinder low hin 'is spirits and discouraged like.

The arch of her bosom only revealed in movement the palpitant emotion that swayed her, with its quick rise and fall, but her voice held the bated quiet of a tempest at the point of breaking. "I'd hate ter hev anybody think I wasn't full loyal ter my kith an' kin. I'd hate ter fail my own people but I hain't no man's woman ter be bartered off ner give away."

"No, sir, I hain't; nor yet no mother never had no fathers nor mothers, as I knows on, an' wot's more, I don't want any. They're a chancey lot, is fathers an' mothers most of 'em. Better without 'em altogether, to my mind. Tother foot, sir." Looking down with a benignant smile at this independent specimen of humanity, the captain obeyed orders.

Ef Abner hain't good 'nough to set foot on yo' place, you hain't good 'nough to set foot on mine; an', by glory, ef you evah do, I'll sick the dogs on you. You need hoss-whippin' to fetch you to yo' senses. You've got so et up with proud flesh an' malice, kaze you can't be high cock-o'-the-walk in Cane Redge chu'ch, thet you're gittin' rabid ez a mad dog."

But come to look at it clost you could see a kind of a determined and sot look in the Stars and Stripes that seemed to say, "Well, now I am here I hain't goin' to be driv out by no yeller grounded flags whatsumever."

"'He always does'! Goodness! Do you know who he is?" demanded Nancy. Pollyanna frowned and shook her head. "I reckon he forgot to tell me one day. You see, I did my part of the introducing, but he didn't." Nancy's eyes widened. "But he never speaks ter anybody, child he hain't for years, I guess, except when he just has to, for business, and all that. He's John Pendleton.