She answered firmly, "I knelt down then and there, by the side of the bed where my poor cousin had just died, and I called God to witness that I would give up the world. I did so; and have never had any inclination to go back into its gaieties and pleasures since.

Cousin Betty, from time to time, as she chatted with Hortense, looked round to see when they might return to the drawing-room; but her young cousin was pelting her with questions, and at the moment when the Baroness opened the glass door she did not happen to be looking.

'It would have done no good and your going there has done good. It has opened your eyes to more than one thing, I don't doubt. But tell me have you told them in Norfolk that you were coming here? 'No I have not written to my cousin. 'Don't be angry with me if I tell you something. I have. 'Have what? 'I have told Mr Belton that you were coming here. It was in this way.

I'm such a duffer at explaining, or I'd have told you last night. My cousin, Lenox Clifford, has come over to England with the American contingent. He has just thirty-six hours' leave, and he rushed over to Petteridge to see the Burritts. Lenox and I were brought up together; I've stayed whole months with them when Uncle Carr had a ranch in New Mexico.

To-morrow I will go with you; but, really, I feel too feeble to-day," said Monroe, languidly. "Well, as you please; to-morrow it shall be. How is your mother?" "Quite well, I thank you." "And the pretty cousin, likewise, I hope?" "She was quite well this morning." "Isn't she at home?" "No, she has gone out." "Confound you, Monroe! you have never let me have a glimpse of her.

Sick or well, everybody is glad to see her." "You also, I presume; especially if they are sick." "And can't get Cousin Arthur," he added. "A young doctor is better than none; though an old and tried physician is deemed the best by sensible people."

"In view of your attentions to my wife's cousin, it was unfortunate that you should have selected this time, this place, for your er adventure." "Exactly! I'm wondering how to spare Miss Warren any annoyance." "I fear that will be impossible. She must know the truth." "She must not know; she must not guess." "M'sieu!" exclaimed the old man. "My wife and I can take no part in your intrigues.

"Why did you not come to the wedding? She was your cousin. People asked where you were. You knew I was going." "Did you need me?" he asked quietly, and his eyes involuntarily swept to the place where he had seen the heliotrope and scarlet make a glow of colour on the other side of the square. "You were not alone." She misunderstood him.

But his mother used to talk to us about him; and Phebe Marlowe does so still. She has painted a portrait of him for Felix." "Is Roland Sefton's mother yet alive?" he asked, with a dull, aching foreboding of her reply. "No," she said. "Oh! how we all loved dear old Madame Sefton! She was always more like Felix and Hilda's mother than Cousin Felicita was.

What you did that day in the cañon will speak better than words for you. Instead you must listen while I tell you the whole story. As it was with you and your cousin, Geoffrey and I we are distantly related too were always good friends.