His feeling is, that he who is for him is greater than all that can be against him. It is no vain boast in him to say, 'I fear God, and know no other fear. It is natural that he should say, when threatened by mistaken or malignant men, 'You may kill me, but you cannot hurt me. The Christian believer can afford to be a martyr.

My soul travaileth sore, and hope and doubt rend me in twain." "Hold fast your hope my friend," said Mr. Pownal, "for all will yet be well. Prepare yourself to hear what, without preparation, might overcome your strength." "Fear not," said Holden. "Yet alas! who knoweth his own heart? But a moment ago, I thought myself as an iron mountain, and now am I weaker than the untimely birth."

I therefore did not stay to hesitate, but desired Laura to steal down stairs before me, and open the door, for that I was determined to attempt the wall. Laura was terrified at the fear of being left behind, for she said she never could climb it. 'Alas!

Far off, and lost to sight, are all the enemies. We fear no change. We 'go no more out.

There could be no fear with the hounds loose to do the hunting." "But suppose when they get to Salem their owner is no more." The Custos laughed. "Him, your honour him no more! Isn't he the man of whom the black folk say: "Lucky buckra morning, lucky new-comer!"

But though there were so many, there was no fear that the feast would run short, for the tables were heaped up with bread and butter and cakes, and fruit, and tea and sugar, and there were pails of milk standing under the trees, and more bread, and more fruit, and more of everything. It was settled that when Miss Darwell came, the feast was to begin.

This he reached without much difficulty; took the right turn; and hoped soon to arrive at the peat-ditch which formed the second point in his carte du pays. After walking however for a longer time than seemed requisite for traversing the distance, he began to fear that he had wandered from the track.

After the first elation of relief, now and then a filmy shadow of Madame de la Rougierre would glide across the sunlight, and the remembrance of her menace return with an unexpected pang of fear. 'Well, if there isn't impittens! cried Mrs. Rusk. 'But never you trouble your head about it, Miss.

You see for one thing people are so peculiar. The quantity of loose stones in this neighbourhood." The predominant feeling about the discussion of these things is, to speak frankly, Fear.

My torngak had told me to go out on the ice, far over the sea in a certain direction where I should find a great berg with many white peaks mounting up to the very sky. There, he said, I should find what I was to do. It was blowing hard at the time; also snowing and freezing. I did not wish to go, but an angekok must go forward and fear nothing when his torngak points the way. Therefore I went."