She refused indignantly, and I laughed at her for getting so fussed up over a little thing. "Marriage is a sacred subject," she said very soberly. "So was politics," said I, "until you came along. If you won't talk marriage let's talk politics. What do you girls want?" "Oh, I told you a while ago," she said.

Edward followed; but his pupil in war as in politics the young prince outgeneralled him at every point, and Simon only escaped at Newport by hurried flight across the river, burning the bridge behind him.

Having wantonly set fire to their house, they now try to put it out by throwing water on it; and where they fail they put the entire blame on the flames." "I see that you have come here to talk politics." "Far from it. I have come, if possible, to explain myself. To understand is always to forgive. That is a great saying of Montaigne's. If I could make you understand..." "You can't.

Stuart, though even then giving promise of the distinction at which he arrived in his profession later in life, was at that period so entirely devoted to politics that the business of the office was altogether a secondary matter to him; and Lincoln, although no longer in his first youth, being then thirty-two years of age, had not yet formed those habits of close application which are indispensable to permanent success at the bar.

I suppose you will admit that I have some claim?" "Certainly," Mannering answered. "I have never denied it." "I am your wife," Blanche said, "though heaven knows why you ever married me. The Duchess is, I suppose, the woman whom you would have married if you hadn't got into a mess with your politics.

But you would not know how to imagine the intrigues and falsehoods which surround me on every side. O mon amie, I must prove to them that I want nothing they can give me that I possess nothing which they can take away." "I know what she means, Pensée," said Sara; "she has to show d'Alchingen that her interests are fixed on art not politics. And, from her point of view, she is right.

On the side of politics, selfishness and ambition were growing; on the side of personal life, vice. . . . It is a thing to be pondered on, that what has kept Greece sterile these last two thousand years or so is, I believe, the malaria; which is a thing that depends for its efficacy on mosquitos.

In domestic politics, the main occurrences were the struggle of the Whigs and Tories, immortalized for us in the pages of Swift, Steele, Addison, and Bolingbroke; the limitation of the succession to the descendants of the Electress Sophia, in the line of Hanover; and the abortive Jacobite movement on the Queen's death which drove Ormond and Atterbury into exile.

Though he became hot in Roman politics, audacious and confident, knowing how to use and how to disregard various weapons of political power as they had been handed down by tradition and law, the "vetoes" and the auguries, and the official dignities, he used them, or disregarded them, in quest only of power for himself.

They then passed over to Ireland, which being in a state of disturbance, Shelley took a part in politics, more reasonable than might have been expected. He inculcated moderation.