At first, for the sake of Blanche, Roland, and my mother, I talked the Captain into reluctant sanction of his sister-in- law's proposal to unite their incomes and share alike, without considering which party brought the larger proportion into the firm.

"That's as may be, Mr Simple; but I've told the story so often, that believe it myself." "What ship were you in?" "In the Blanche, Captain Faulkner, who was as fine a fellow as poor Captain Savage, whom we buried yesterday; there could not be a finer than either of them. I was at the taking of the Pique, and carried him down below after he had received his mortal wound.

It was a very jolly show, in spite of my partner bumping his head against the beam every time we went round, and people came from far and near. It was over about five, and we hastened back to prepare for our Christmas dinner in Mess. Fancy dress had been decided on, and as it was to be only among ourselves we were given carte blanche as to ideas.

It was the body of Chelteux. "A fitting close to the career of such a wretch," said the Journal des Debats, in noting the event. When she read this news, Mme. Blanche felt as a culprit would feel on reading his death-warrant. "The end is near," she murmured. "Lacheneur is coming!" The duchess was not mistaken.

She is on board of the Blanche at this moment; and Ruth will be delighted to see you and all your people." "I am glad all is so happy with you, and I may be tempted to marry myself," laughed the commander. "You are already tempted, and you will yield to the temptation."

Where do you think Blanche has been?" she cried out eagerly. "To Paris, to Scotland, to the Casino?" "To Shepherd's Inn, to see Fanny; but Fanny wasn't there, and Blanche is going to leave a present for her. Isn't it kind of her and thoughtful?" And she handed the letter to Pen who read

Why don't you say so, Mr. Longueville?" Blanche demanded. "I never saw any one take things so quietly. Have n't you got any patriotism?" "My patriotism is modified by an indisposition to generalize," said Bernard, laughing. "On this point permit me not to generalize. I am interested in the particular case in ascertaining whether Mrs. Vivian thinks very often of Gordon Wright's income."

"Because, when we are so much beloved, we must, I hope, deserve it." "See what a vain thing it is!" said Blanche, smoothing with her slender fingers the parting of the hair on her sister's forehead. After a moment's reflection, Rose said to her: "Don't you think we should relate all this to Dagobert?" "If you think so, let us do it." "We tell him everything, as we told everything to mother.

"He always says the old walls might fall in at any time; but since you told me about the lights being seen, I've been thinking that perhaps he has heard about them too, and that's why he won't come here if he can help it. But we can ask him. What is the 'Mistletoe Bough'? Is it a story about a chest?" "Haven't you heard it?" asked Blanche, surprised. "I believe I can repeat it to you.

We sat silent for some minutes, watching the sea, and noting how quickly the wind was falling, when presently my comrade turned to me. "You asked me why I did not try to make the German head station in Blanche Bay, after my crew were killed," he said. "Well, I'll tell you.