The virgins were restored to their parents, and many a desolate home was made joyful, and many mourning garments taken off. Then all the people were grateful for his valor. Sazayé is a shell-fish, which is very proud of its shell. This is high, full of points like towers, and thick like a castle wall.

Scrymgeour was an artist and a man of means, so proud of his profession that he gave all his pictures fancy prices, and so wealthy that he could have bought them. To him I went when I wanted money though it must not be thought that I borrowed. In the days of the Arcadia Mixture I had no bank account.

And he told every one of 'em, he told everybody, that he thought as much agin of the honor as he did of the money. It showed that he wus thought so much of, not only in Jonesville, but the world at large. Why, he took such solid comfort in it, that it did honestly seem as if he grew fat, he wus so puffed up by it, and proud.

Some of these, like Venice and Genoa, boasted the proud title of republics; they were in reality narrow, commercial, even piratical oligarchies, destitute of any vigorous political life. The Pope, like other petty rulers, was but a temporal prince, despotic, and not even enlightened, as was the Grand Duke of Tuscany.

Her nerves tingled with pity for Burnamy, but in her heart she was glad that her husband had had strength to side with him against himself, and she was proud of the forbearance with which he had done it. In their earlier married life she would have confidently taken the initiative on all moral questions.

Then Aunt Bridget, holding on to her half-moon bonnet and crying: "You happy, happy child! But what a wind! There's been nothing like it since the day you were born." My father came next, like a gale of wind himself, saying: "I'm proud of you, gel. Right proud I am. You done well."

"Perhaps," replied the engineer, "but we will begin by first manufacturing some bows and arrows, and I don't doubt that you will become as clever in the use of them as the Australian hunters." "Bows and arrows!" said Pencroft scornfully. "That's all very well for children!" "Don't be proud, friend Pencroft," replied the reporter.

But the strange visitor who came to Phineas in the midst of these troubles put an end to them all. The strange visitor was Miss Aspasia Fitzgibbon. "You'll be very much surprised at my coming to your chambers, no doubt," she said, as she sat down in the chair which Phineas placed for her. Phineas could only say that he was very proud to be so highly honoured, and that he hoped she was well.

"I thought 'twould look too much like demanding it as a right too much like begging, and I s'pose I felt too proud. Pride is my besetting sin the one I pray most against."

And shall we now try to belittle the mighty structure because other though kindred hands are laying the top courses while we have elected to found a new tower in another land? The American eulogist of civilization who is not proud of his heritage in England's glory is unworthy to enjoy his lesser heritage in the lesser glory of his own country.