The men on the farm though, couldna blame 'im for that. They were juist as flichtered themsels, an' mony a time I saw them hittin' the dogs for whinin' at the soond. The wy the dogs took on was fearsome in itsel, for they seemed to ken, aye when nicht cam on, 'at the rockin' would sune begin, an' if they werena chained they cam runnin' to the hoose.

Sam was scarcely less staggered, for in the countenance of the well-shaped female servant, he beheld the very features of his valentine, the pretty housemaid from Mr. Nupkins's. 'Wy, Mary, my dear! said Sam. 'Lauk, Mr. Weller, said Mary, 'how you do frighten one! Sam made no verbal answer to this complaint, nor can we precisely say what reply he did make.

Syne Jean, the auldest lassie, gets up frae the table an' lifts the jug or the plates an' gaes awa ben to the east room for what's wanted. Ay, it's a wy o' doin' 'at's juist like the gentry, but I'll tell ye, Jess, Pete juist fair hated the soond o' that bell, an' there's them 'at says it was the death o' 'im. To think o' Marget ha'en sic an establishment! . . .

The challenger chuckled deprecatingly over the carelessness of judgment evinced: "Price Mason's pony comes down with a hippety-hop," he remarked pityingly "lemme listen it's no, taint, aint favorin' his right front foot it's wy!" the challenger suddenly twisted his head to one side and held it there like a lean-crawed chicken deciding where to peck.

"It'll do the fresh laddie gude," quoth Tom, a trifle abashed but ready to stand by his guns, "I'm thenkin' he's one of them what feels they owns the airth, an' is bound to step on all worms of the dust whut comes in thur wy. But Jim, mon, we better be steppin' on, fer tomorra's the Sawbeth ya ken, an' it wuddent be gude for our souls if the parson shud cum out to investigate."

"Ilka mornin'," pursued Tammas, "I would hae said to her, 'Mary, I would hae said, 'wha's to wear thae breeks the day, you or me? Ay, syne I would hae ordered her to kindle the fire, or if I had been the king, of coorse I would hae telt her instead to ring the bell an' hae the cloth laid for the breakfast. Ay, that's the wy to mak the like o' Mary respec ye." Pete and I left them talking.

"It took them a gude fower oors tae get across, an' it wes coorse wark; they likit him weel doon that wy, an', Jamie, man" here Drumsheugh's voice changed its note, and his public manner disappeared "what div ye think o' this? every man o' them has on his blacks." "It's mair than cud be expeckit" said Jamie; "but whar dae yon men come frae, Drumsheugh?"

Leeby did not keep this news to herself, and soon it was through the town. Jeames's face began to brighten. "They're comin' round to a mair sensible wy o' lookin' at things," he told Hendry. "I was walkin' wi' the wife i' the buryin' ground yesterday, an' we met Kitty McQueen.

The Auld Licht kirk would be half an hour yet. "But, Sanders," said Sam'l, brightening up, "ye was on yer wy to spier her yer-sel." "I was, Sam'l," said Sanders, "and I canna but be thankfu' ye was ower quick for's." "Gin't hadna been you," said Sam'l, "I wid never hae thocht o't."

Ye savit Flora Cammil, and young Burnbrae, an' yon shepherd's wife Dunleith wy, an' we were a sae prood o' ye, an' pleased tae think that ye hed keepit deith frae anither hame. Can ye no think o' somethin' tae help Annie, and gie her back tae her man and bairnies?" and Tammas searched the doctor's face in the cold, weird light.