They didn't get you before." "No," said the puncher. "More by good luck than good management. I don't like going things blind, Pete. And you're always so blamed secretive." "I have to be," growled the other. "You're as leaky as a sieve yourself, Ratty. I never could trust you." "Nor nobody else," laughed the reckless puncher. "Sam's about got my number now. If he ain't the gal has "

It always seemed to Pete that he was a broker exactly as a beaver is a dam-builder, because nature had adapted him to that task. But outside of this one instinctive capacity he had no sense whatsoever. He rarely appeared in the office.

Pete was glad that Annersley would never know of all this and yet it seemed as though Annersley could see these things and Pete, standing alone in the room, felt as though he were in some way to blame for this disorder and squalidness. Time and occupation had rather dulled Pete's remembrance of the actual detail of the place, but now its original neatness and orderliness came back to him vividly.

"That's Red Pete and Bud McCaffrey, two of the oldest crooks in the business," he said. "They're wanted for more things than that affair of yours. It will be a feather in my cap if I gather them in." He tightened his grip on the club as he came close to the two men. They looked up at him, and a startled look came into their eyes as they saw his uniform. "Hello, Pete.

"`Look where? I returned, also in a sort of whisper; `and what am I to hush for? "`Look to your right, at Pete, which is the name by which we usually addressed Fleming `lying fast asleep there, and see what you'll see, replied Dirk.

"Give up Saint Andrew's!" repeated Father Mack in a low, startled voice. "You, Dan! Give up! Oh, no, my boy, no!" "Aunt Winnie will die if I don't," blurted out Dan, despairingly. "Pete Patterson says so. And I can take her home and give her back her little rooms over Mulligans', and the blue teapot and Tabby, and everything she loves. And Pete says I can work up to be his partner."

Pete, hobbling to him, gazed curiously down, and Bella knelt opposite and drew away Hugh's mackinaw coat, with which he had wrapped his trove.

"Wal, you wouldn't 'spicion what a trick French Pete and Dick was trying to play on me. It was the idea of Pete, but Dick promised to do his part. Pete agreed to let Dick have a whole keg of his best or rather worst whiskey without charging him a cent. He was to take it with us, with the sole purpose of getting me into the habit of drinking again.

"Maybe better, I don't know," remarked Pete, rather skeptically. "Always hard find trail out big lakes. May leave plenty places. Take more time hunt trail maybe now. Indian maps no good. Maybe easier when we find him." Pete was right, and I did not know the difficulties still to be met with before we should reach Michikamau.

Just to keep them dandy-divils from plaguing you, I'll tell Phil to have an eye on you while I'm away." "Mr. Christian?" "Call him Philip, Kate. He's as free as free. No pride at all. Let him take care of you till I come back." "I'm shutting the window, Pete!" "Wait! Something else. Bend down so the ould man won't hear." "I can't reach what is it?" "Your hand, then; I'll tell it to your hand."