No, no, it's going to settle down to raining. An hour or two of chop, perhaps, but not enough to make a chicken sea-sick!" "Well, it's rain or it's wind. But if it's wind, the way it looks from here, it's all day with the man that gets into it!" "Oh, go along home, tio," the Rector snapped with a rudeness he had never used toward that old salt before.

Her peasant headdress was high and elaborate, winged with chicken feathers, and her short skirts gave way before white stockings pulpily emerging from painted wooden shoes which clicked over the dull tiled floor. By the table she knitted, watching the eating solicitously, and was by turns candid, sociable and saucy as a spoiled child.

Porter insisted upon finishing the Little Chicken series, so that 'deserve' is a poor word for any honour that might accrue to him for his part in the book." This was the nucleus of the book, but the story itself originated from the fact that one day, while leaving the swamp, a big feather with a shaft over twenty inches long came spinning and swirling earthward and fell in the author's path.

"Please talk, and don't watch me," she begged. "I'm ashamed to be so hungry." He smiled and helped her to some more chicken. If he talked he was scarcely conscious of what he said. All the time his eyes kept straying towards her. She had taken off her jacket and was dressed simply enough in a blouse of some soft white material and a dark skirt.

At that little log hotel of ten or twelve rooms there were seven kinds of meat black-tail deer, white-tail deer, bear, grouse, prairie chicken, squirrels, and domestic fowl the latter still in possession of their heads.

"Nor I," said Kretzschmar; "there is a great difference between the court-lady and the companion. "One could almost envy the king's greyhounds!" sighed the second footman. "We get dogs' wages, and they the chicken and good treatment. It is a pity!" "The worst of it is, the king forbids us to marry!" said Kretzschmar sadly.

By which admonition Julia Cloud became aware that Ellen was going to favor them with some of her famous chicken potpie. She stood still for a whole minute with a light in her eyes and a smile on her face, listening to Ellen's retreating footsteps down the stairs; then, as the Ford set up its churning clatter, she turned back to her task, and murmured softly, "Poor Ellen!"

He had certainly looked lonely when Marmaduke and Wienerwurst had found him sitting up there on the hill, and the little boy couldn't help asking, "Don't you ever feel lonely? You haven't any wife, and Mother says she pities a man without chicken or child 'tleast she said something like that and how it wasn't good for a man to live alone an' you do out in your bunkhouse."

When I returned to the sitting-room I found that Paul had shut himself in the other room, so I sat down to wait. A waiter went to and fro, bringing plates and glasses. He laid the table slowly, then put a cold chicken on it, and told me that all was ready. I knocked gently at Mademoiselle Rondoli's door.

When supper is over the rest of the girls will help me do the talking, but now they are every one busy except Allee and me, and Allee's getting dressed. There's someone at the door. I hope it ain't more comp'ny. S'posing it is, wouldn't that be the worst luck, the very night we have roast chicken!" Before Peace could reach the door to see who was there, however, Mr.