'If yo're so set upo' knowing who t' fellow was, a could, mebbe, put yo' on his tracks. 'How? said Hester, eagerly. 'I do want to know. I want to know very much, and for a good reason. 'Well, then, a'll tell yo'. He's a queer tyke, that one is. A'll be bound he were sore pressed for t' brass; yet he out's wi' a good half-crown, all wrapped up i' paper, and he axes me t' make a hole in it.

I'm sure that you wouldn't keep smiling at me like a Cheshire cat if there wasn't something behind this." "You're right, Mr Leather," said Ben, becoming at once grave and earnest. "There is somethin' behind it ay, an' somethin' before it too. So much, that I have barely time to tell 'ee. So, listen wi' both ears.

We saw the slates an' the chimney pots fair jump in the air an' the 'ole 'ouse sort of collapsed in a heap an' a billowin' cloud o' white smoke an' dust. There was some of our troops hookin' a few wounded civilians out as we passed and the road was cluttered up wi' bricks an' half a door an' broken bits o' chairs an' tables an' crockery. Fair blew the inside out o' the house, that shell did.

"You are thirsting for vengeance upon Mother Demdike. You shall have it." "Eigh, eigh, you promised me vengeance efore," cried the miller "vengeance by the law. Boh ey mun wait lung for it. Ey wad ha' it swift and sure deep and deadly. Ey wad blast her wi' curses, os hoo blasted my poor Meary. Ey wad strike her deeod at my feet. That's my vengeance, mon." "You shall have it," replied the other.

Sometimes we starve for six or eight days at a time, and then when we get plenty, we lay in good store and pack it well down, always beginnin' wi' the best pieces first, for fear that some skulkin' Redskin should kill us before we've had time to enjoy them. See here, you've only had the first course; rest a bit while I prepare the second."

"Come with me," said the mendicant, almost dragging him off; "the Captain's plan is the best I'll carry ye to a place where ye might be concealed in the meantime, were they to seek ye 'wi' sleuth-hounds." "Go, go," again urged Lieutenant Taffril "to stay here is mere madness." "It was worse madness to have come hither," said Lovel, pressing his hand "But farewell!"

The landlord, "a man called Inglis, wi' offices up in Clark Street, who does a deal of that class of property" it was evident that he admired such saw a prospect of getting tenants to take on the house at a higher rental.

Suddenly they were recalled into the parlour. John Foster was fumbling with the papers a little nervously: Jeremiah spoke 'We have not thought it necessary to commend Hester Rose to you; if she had been a lad she would have had a third o' the business along wi' yo'. Being a woman, it's ill troubling her with a partnership; better give her a fixed salary till such time as she marries.

The mouth-organist played on unheedingly and Private Robinson sat following him with attentive ear. 'I'm not sure of that bit just there, said the player, and tried it over with slight variations. 'P'raps I'll remember it better after a day or two. I'm like that wi' some toons. 'We might kid 'em to sing it again, said Robinson hopefully, as another loud cry of 'Encore! rang from the trench.

"Yes, sir, he be a-sitting with John Stukeley, who they say is main bad. It seems as how he has taken a fancy to t' lad, though why he should oi dunno, for Bill had nowt to do wi' his lot. Perhaps he thinks now as Bill were right and he were wrong; perhaps it only is as if Bill ha' got a name in the village of being a soft hearted chap, allus ready to sit up at noight wi' any one as is ill.