"They are not Annie's friends; they're just her neighbours. Not Annie's kind at all. They're good-hearted enough, but it distressed Annie all the time to have any of them take care of Ellen. They give her all sorts of things to eat. She's only a baby. She was half-sick when I was here Thursday. Oh, don't make a fuss, Jeff! Please, dear!" "But you don't know anything about babies."

"I will go seek your husband," I said, to change the subject, for even to Annie I would not lay open all my heart about Lorna: "but only upon condition that you ensure this house and people from the Doones meanwhile. Even for the sake of Tom, I cannot leave all helpless. The oat-ricks and the hay-ricks, which are my only love, they are welcome to make cinders of.

"But why did not the rejected lover send the letter he received and which he must have known he had no right to retain to Miss Moran, or to the Englishman for whom it was intended? A man who could keep a letter like that, must have some envious sneaking devil in his body. A bad man, Mary, a bad man the air must be unclean in any room he comes into." "Why Annie! How angry you are.

Little fairy Annie danced by her side, now stopping to gather a flower, now to listen to a bird, chatting and laughing all the way, as though she were a bird herself, and never heeding Aunty's melancholy looks or short answers. "Who are those people?" asked Mrs. Randolph of her husband, as she watched the odd-looking pair come along the road. "Do look, Harry.

If Hunting secretly exulted that Gregory was out of the way, and had been taught by Annie that he must keep his distance, as he would express it, he was also secretly uneasy at her manner toward him. She merely endured his lavish attentions, and seemed relieved when he was compelled to leave her for a time.

It fairly sings in my head when I feel deeply, as I do about Tobe and Annie, for instance, or when I have to make a speech." "Make a speech? You?" Mostyn stared. "Oh yes, these people expect all that sort of thing from a teacher, and it was very hard for me to do at first, but I don't mind it now.

Annie was a great help to her mother, and fast learning to be a good housewife. The poultry was her particular care, and she had already received from Mrs. Watson a cock, half a dozen hens, and two pairs of fine turkeys, with many useful directions concerning their management.

After a few moments he said, very gently and gravely, "Annie, do you remember when my arm last encircled you?" The crimson face turned pale as she recalled that awful midnight when he rescued her from death. Both breathed fervently, "How good God has been to us!" In their joy, as in fear and sorrow, they remembered Him.

"We all feel that," said Annie. "You know that feeling? Well, there have been some things in myself which I rather wonder at now; some things that I would not do now. I once struck my husband." "Once!" thought Annie in amazement. "And I think I may have been too peremptory with the children.

"Oh!" laughed Annie, putting her under lip between her teeth. "And I told her it was a new draught. Where's that milk?" They both went upstairs. "I wonder why nurse didn't come to settle me down?" complained the mother, like a child, wistfully. "She said she was going to a concert, my love," replied Annie. "Did she?" They were silent a minute. Mrs. Morel gulped the little clean milk.