Lord Ipsden stepped forward; the people tacitly accepted him as the vehicle of their curiosity. "Who was it, Christie?" "I dinna ken, for my pairt!" Mrs. Gatty came out of the house. "A handsome young fellow, I hope, Christie?" resumed Lord Ipsden. "Ye maun ask Flucker," was the reply. "I could no tak muckle notice, ye ken," putting her hand before her eye, and half smiling. "Well!

But he 'ont be found guilty, if they do tak him. Owen, bach! it was killing me, 'deet to goodness it was, 'Don't cry, Aunt 'Lizbeth, I wanted to speak to you about Netta. 'Oh seure! she 'ont come to see her husband's mother! and I don't be cheusing to be turned out of doors again. 'She is very ill, aunt. We don't know whether she can ever recover.

A wuman micht du that, but a man, and special a wuman's ain ae son, canna weel du 't that is, gien there's ony ither coorse 'at can be followt. It seems to me ye maun tak the risk o' her bottle. And it may be no ill thing 'at she sud disgrace hersel oot and oot.

"Will ye no tak' it to please an auld man, bairn?" "Deed will I, sir, I wad do a hantle mair nor that to please you." And again the tears filled her blue eyes as she held out her hand receiving in it a shilling which Mr Cowie, for more relief to his own burdened heart, had substituted for the sixpence. "It's a shillin', sir!" she said, looking up at him with the coin lying on her open palm.

"Weel, Mysie," he said, drawing a long breath, as if to face a stiff proposition, "there is no other way out of it, but that you'll hae to marry me now just this minute, an' gang back wi' me. If you do that, I can tak' you back wi' me, an' gang to your faither an' say that it was me that was responsible. It can be done, Mysie, if only you'll agree to it.

There maun be those that sell tickets, and tak' them at the doors, and ushers to show the folk their seats. And e'en before a'body comes tae the hoose to pay his siller for a ticket there's others I'm dependent upon. How do they ken I'm in the toon at a'? They've read it in the papers, maybe and there's reporters and printers I've tae thank.

'What was he like? how old? tell me. 'My lass, a've summut else to do wi' my eyes than go peering into men's faces i' t' dusk light. 'But yo' must have had light for t' judge about the watch. 'Eh! how sharp we are! A'd a candle close to my nose. But a didn't tak' it up for to gaze int' his face. That wouldn't be manners, to my thinking. Hester was silent. Then Darley's heart relented.

"Did she blaaze much, mun?" "Blaze! why, everything was lit up, and the smoke and sparks flew in clouds!" "Did it, though?" said Dave thoughtfully. "Now, look here, lad," he continued, taking out his tobacco-box; "some on 'em says a man shouldn't tak' his bit o' opium, and that he should smoke 'bacco. I say it's wrong.

The card which happened to lie outermost, at the right-hand end of the circle, was, according to rule in such cases, the card chosen to represent Me. By way of being appropriate to my situation as a poor groom out of employment, the card was the King of Diamonds. "I tak' up the King o' Diamants," says my aunt. "I count seven cairds fra' richt to left; and I humbly ask a blessing on what follows."

Ye wad hae us tak her in for a whilie, till she luiks up a bit, puir thing? Hoo auld may she be?" "She can hardly be mair nor twenty, or aboot that sic like as your ain bonnie lassie would hae been by this time, gien she had ripent here i'stead o' gaein awa to the gran' finishin schuil o' the just made perfec. Weel min' I her bonny face! And, 'deed, this ane's no' that unlike yer ain Isy!