"Don't much b'lieve I could," said he, thoughtfully. "I hev been t' meeting but I hain't never been no great hand fer prayin'." "'T wouldn't sound right nohow, fer me t' pray," said my father, "I got s' kind o' rough when I was in the army." "'Fraid it 'll come a leetle unhandy fer me," said D'ri, with a look of embarrassment, "but I don't never shirk a tough job ef it hes t' be done."

But we hope to carry you off with us now in time for luncheon." "I don't know how to thank you," said Adrian. "But I 'm afraid I hate to destroy an illusion, yet in honesty I must I 'm afraid I 'm not the person you take me for. I 'm afraid there's a misapprehension. "Oh, we 'll respect your incog all right, if that's what's troubling you," promised Baldo. "You shall be Mr. Anthony Craford."

'It's his cunning strategy, poor creature, so that he may be thought to have delivered us at the head of the town, for us to make a purchase or two, if we go to the inn on foot, said Diana. 'We 'll let the manoeuvre succeed. Redworth declared that she had a head for everything, and she was flattered to hear him.

Sits hours long, and cocks her ears at orders of applicants for drugs across the counter, and sometimes catches wind of a prescription, and consults her chemist, and thinks she 'll try it herself. It's a basket of medicine bottles driven to Regent's Park pretty well every day. 'Ha!

I hope in my heart everything is as fine as fippence, or my lady 'll turn up her nose. 'I can't make things neater, Davy. This was said by Mrs Prothero, in a desponding tone, quite different from her former quiet cheerfulness, and she accompanied the words by rubbing her hands nervously one over the other. 'There now, don't look as if you were going to be smothered.

Tinman was waiting for the cheapest Insurance office," a man remarked to Mrs. Crickledon. "The least to pay is to the undertaker," she replied, standing on tiptoe. "And it's to be hoped he 'll pay more to-day. If only those walls don't fall and stop the chance of the boat to save him for more outlay, poor man!

Of course," he remarked, "I know all the men folks, an' they know me, but I never ben into none o' their houses except now an' then on a matter of bus'nis, an' I guess," he said with a laugh, "that Polly 'd allow 't she don't spend all her time in that circle. Still," he added, "they all know her, an' ev'ry little while some o' the women folks 'll come in an' see her.

She demands them the same day." "What!" "Oh, I thought you didn't understand," chuckled Tom. "When you make one, you have to make both. Mother always did she had to; 't was the only way she could suit both the twins, and I don't believe you 'll find any other way out of it. As for us we don't mind; we eat them all!" "Oh!" said Cousin Helen faintly.

That Mrs. Lawrence Finchley has dropped the curtsey to her great-aunt and sworn to be a good girl, for a change, if Lady de Culme will do the chaperon, and force Lord Ormont's hand. My brother shrugs. There'll be a nice explosion one day soon. Presented? The Court won't have her. That I know for positive. If she's pushed forward, she 'll be bitterly snubbed.

"Nurse 'll like them of course she will," she said gently. "She'll like them because they are you. Read them to her as you read them to me, and she'll only hear your voice, and she'll think them clever and you a wonderful man, even if you are fifty and weigh a thousand pounds.