Duval had disappeared, but, as I stood there looking about for him to say good-bye, a young country fellow came up hurriedly from out the darkness. "You're wanted down thar," he said, with the jerk of a thumb over his shoulder. "The Tory officer wants to see ye." "What officer? Captain Grant?" "I reckon that's the one," indifferently; "anyhow I was told to fetch ye down thar. Bannister sent me."

If you ain't possessed of the gift of logic it takes with you, but if you are possessed of it, it don't. Now, I tell you that if a farmer was to try to run his farm on the wasteful scale on which this world is conducted, thar wouldn't be one among us as would trust him with next season's crops. 'Tis sech a terrible waste that it makes a frugal mind sick to see it."

The trees were all alike thereabout and easily mistaken one for another. Well?" "Thar was one of 'em different," pursued Rube, "a silver birch tree amongst the cotton-woods an' I found where you'd cut a stick from it an' smudged the cut so's it wouldn't easily be seen. Is that right? You carried that stick along of you brought it home.

Sure enough the creek was partly filled with the debris, and here the opposite bank was overflowed to the extent of several acres. "We may find some rich deposits down thar," said Wumble. "A landslide sometimes provides a harvest for prospectors." They moved on cautiously until they came to the spot where the Baxters and Roebuck had been seen last.

The particulars of the contest even tradition has not preserved the sequel to the narrative only telling that half an hour later the first squatter, scratched and bloody, hobbled slowly up to the cabin, remarking satirically as he threw down the broken axe: "Thar, neighbour; I'm afraid I've spiled yer axe, but I'm sure I've spiled the bar.

"What, YOU married now?" "Well, perhaps that's a question. It's a good deal like my beein' an orphan oncertain and onsettled." He paused to pursue an evasive crumb to the end of the bench and having captured it, went on: "It was when I was younger than you be, and she warn't very old neither. But she knew a heap more than I did; and ez to readin' and writin', she was thar, I tell you, every time.

What's that feller doin' over thar with that crowd about him?" "Preaching," Foster answered. "Wall, he couldn't call up mourners the wagins would run over 'em. What do you think of all this, Jasper?" "Who, me?" the old man replied as if startled out of a dream, "I wasn't thinkin' of it didn't see it." "I don't reckon," said Laz, "that all these folks knows we air goin' to jail."

Always roastin' ur freezin'. It'd been different if I'd had any one t' help me stand it. But th' men were always findin' fault. They blamed me fur everythin'. I used t' lie awake at night an' hear 'em talkin' me over. It made me lonesome, I tell you! Thar wasn't no one! Mother used t' write. But I never told her th' truth. She ain't a suspicion of what I've been a-goin' through."

But the captain detained him by laying a firm and heavy hand upon his shoulder. "Keep out of thar," he ordered. "I've jist been scrubbin' an' don't want ye to dirty the place up." The tone of his father's voice caused Eben to swing suddenly around. "Me feet ain't dirty," he drawled. "An' s'pose they are, what's the difference? The cabin ain't no parler. Let me go; I'm most starved."

I wuz on a road I never traveled before goin' to see an old greaser, ownin' a mighty pretty piece of ground I wanted when all of a sudden I come on a cabin, an' thar stood Bill in front of it, a-smokin'. I axed him fur a light, an' when he came up to give it to me, I grabbed him by the shirt-collar an' dug the spur into the mare.