You might take out that bucket of ashes for me. You'll find the heap where they go down in the little yard behind the stable. There now! That's what comes o' talkin'! If I didden forget to ask a blessin', an' you an orphan, too, I believe! F'what we've received. Lor', make us truly thangful cry-say-carmen Off you go!

I guess he's what they call a good listener, for he seemed to be real interested, especially when Miss Howes was talkin'. He'd look at her and look at her, and time and time again I thought he was goin' to say somethin', but he didn't." He was not talkative when alone with Captain Obed that afternoon.

He's loike to have the consate, so he is, take him down as a body will. But there's wan good thing about it. While he's studyin' to beat us all on the talkin' he's lettin' the little b'ys alone famous. He didn't never do much to 'em, but he jist riled 'em completely, so he did, and made 'em cross at iverybody." A month went along very quietly and, following that, another month.

"Callate you're sizable enough." "Wish you was in the House," remarked Mr. Adams of Barren. "None of us is much on talk, but if we had you, I guess we could lay things wide open." "If you was thar, and give it to 'em as hot as you did when you was talkin' for Zeb, them skunks in the front seats wouldn't know whether they was afoot or hossback," declared Mr.

But you've got to answer some questions when you're able and it's a question of holding you here or taking you with us. How about it?" "Look here!" snarled King, and his voice rang out with sudden energy. "Who you talkin' to?" "Now take it easy, Harry," advised Thong. "We're talking to you, of course." Harry King seemed to begin the process of sobering up.

But while Captain Triggs had been saying these words his thoughts had made a sudden leap toward the truth, and, finding Reuben not ready with a remark, he continued: "'Tain't on no account of the young female you comed aboard here with that's makin' 'ee think o' Cornwall, is it?" "Yes, it is," said Reuben bluntly. "I want to see her. I've had a letter from her, and it needs a little talkin' over."

"And Milly looked him in the eyes and said as gentle and easy as if she'd been talkin' to a sick child: 'I've always been an honest woman, Dick. "This kind o' took him back again, but he says, right earnest and pitiful, 'I want to marry you, Milly; don't refuse me. I want to do one decent thing before I die. I've come all the way from California just for this.

Her small, energetic figure moved briskly from one room to the other, and as she worked she sang in a low, chanting tone: "You got a shoe, I got a shoe, All God's children got shoes. When I git to heaben, gwine try on my shoes, Gwine walk all over God's heaben, heaben, heaben. Ever'body's talkin' 'bout heaben ain't gwine to heaben Heaben, heaben, gwine walk all over God's heaben."

"You must have better living conditions." "But where? Rents in this town has boomed since the war began. Ain't that got to you yet? There ain't no place left fer the poor." "Then we must find places and make them healthy and beautiful." "For the love of Mike! She's talkin' about heaven, ain't she?" "She's talkin' through her hat!" cried another. "Then, we mean to make the factories obey the laws.

Rack's expression was dolefully sullen. Racey's was hard and uncompromising. "Who was it put you up to this?" asked Racey. "What?" "Coming out here after me." "I didn't come out after you, I tell you!" "Shore, shore," soothed Racey, "I know all about that. Who put you up to it?" "I dunno what yo're talkin' about."