Then what'll become of your circus-hoss, an' your painted boats, an' your fine guns what break in two in the middle?" "I don't keer," answered Dan, doggedly. "I wouldn't go into that tater-patch alone, arter dark; if I knowed it was chuck full of yaller gold an' silver pieces."

"It was then the fairy-man and the fairy-woman began talking, and I heard every word they said, as no doubt they meant I should. 'What'll we do with the little beast at all? says she. "'We'll do something that's not too unpleasant at first, says he. 'We'll take him and hold his head under the water, and see will that drive any of the devilment out of him. "'Oh, the thief! says she.

I'll be dumbed if I ever imagined there wuz sich a passel o' condemned thieves on the face o' the airth. And they all seem sich nice, gentlemanly fellers, too. What'll we do with them when they git back home?" Presently he roused himself up to carry out his idea of getting a good meal ready for the boys by the time they returned, tired and hungry.

You'll get the order every time." So, naturally, as the moment was one of sympathy, it was Mr. Gingham who spoke first. "What'll you do, Josh," he said, "if the Commissioners go against you?" "Boys," said Mr. Smith, "I don't rightly know. If I have to quit, the next move is to the city. But I don't reckon that I will have to quit. I've got an idee that I think's good every time."

"I wish I might be here to see what'll happen," said he, "but I'm going up the river to-night to see a gal and mebby won't be back again for three or four days." The next afternoon the English bark set sail as the captain promised, and that night Lewes town was awake until almost morning, gazing at a broad red glare that lighted up the sky away toward the southeast.

"But how is He to know if you don't tell Him?" said the boy, in an impatient tone. "Don't you know that God can see us all the time; that He's taking care of us always?" said Tiny, slowly. "Oh, come! what'll you tell us next?" said Dick, looking over his shoulder with a gesture of fear. "He ain't here now, you know," he added.

"Keep your seats," cautioned Professor O'Reilley as he jumped up on the stage. "The drawing for prizes will now take place. Ryan," to his assistant, "bring them out on the stage as I call for them." A babel arose. "Don't you wish you could win the skates, Jim?" "What'll you do if you get a ring?" "And there's dolls and doll carriages, too." The showman raised an arm as a signal for silence.

An' what's more, I couldn't forgit it; but when I'd look at him I'd feel, every time, the nightmare o' that great wicked face hangin' there over the cliff, close to mine. So, he don't perform. What'll ye take, boys? It's hot milk, this time, fer mine."

I've just got to go into my office for an hour to talk the day's business over with my son you take this newspaper out into the garden there with one of these cigars, and read what'll you find in it, and when you've read that we'll have some more talk." Spargo carried the old newspaper into the sunlit garden.

The thing now is to find the direction Jamie probably took from here, and the snow has covered all trace of him." "With his trail all covered, there'll be no trackin' he. What'll we do about un?" asked David. "'Tis hard to think out what way Jamie'd be like to go from here." "Let's try goin' the way the paper said the cache was," suggested Andy.