From this were taken two lines appropriated by Horace, and instanced as models of graceful flattery: "Tene magis salvum populus velit, an populum tu, Servet in ambiguum qui consulit et tibi et Urbi, Iupiter."

Inhabitants of Norfolk and Suffolk. Rem Romanam huc satietate gloriæ provectam, ut externis quoque gentibus quietem velit. Tacit. Annal. Nam duces, ubi impetrando triumphalium insigni sufficere res suas crediderant, hostam omittebant. Tacit. Annal. Sigonii de Antiquo Jure Provinciarum, Lib. 1 and 2. Cic. in Verrem, I.

They crossed the fatal river; they were whole days in crossing; those set to count them gave it up in despair; Ammianus says: 'He who wishes to know their number, 'Libyci velit aequoris idem Discere quam multae Zephyro volvuntur arenae. And when they were across, they gave up the children. They had not the heart to give up the beloved weapons.

Shall we justify the accusations of our adversaries? Hoc Ithacus velit The Tories and Jacobites will behold us with a malicious pleasure, determined upon the ruin of our friends: For is not the present set of bishops almost entirely of that number, as well as a great majority of the principal clergy? And a short time will reduce the whole, by vacancies upon death.

"Hoc Ithacus velit." And finally, within two years of his death, in his striking sermon on the ministerial office, 'In God's name stop!... Ye are a new phenomenon on the earth a body of people who, being of no sect or party, are friends to all parties, and endeavour to forward all in heart-religion, in the knowledge and love of God and man.

That line was erased, and the line as it stands in the Works is substituted in Mr. Langton's hand, as is also an alteration in the 16th line, velit into jubet. Jubet however is in the copy as printed by Boswell. Mr. Langton edited some, if not all, of Johnson's Latin poems.

"Me Guido de Senis diebus depinxit amoenis Quem Christus lenis nullis velit angere poenis."

Joseph Hume was his especial target, and was dished up week after week with a decidedly original Latin garnish: 'Ex humili potens From a surgeon to a member of Parliament; 'Humili modi loqui To talk Scotch like Hume; 'Nequis humasse velit Let no one call Hume an ass, etc., etc.

For Women born to be controll'd Stoop to the forward and the bold; Affect the haughty, and the proud, The gay, the frolick, and the loud. No. 149. Tuesday, August 21, 1711. Steele. 'Cui in manu sit quem esse dementem velit, Quem sapere, quem sanari, quem in morbum injici, Quem contra amari, quem accersiri, quem expeti. Caecil. apud Tull.

Min. vol. iii. p. 487. Lat. A sort of -parabasis- in the -Curculio- of Plautus describes what went on in the market-place of the capital, with little humour perhaps, but with life-like distinctness. -Conmonstrabo, quo in quemque hominem facile inveniatis loco, Ne nimio opere sumat operam, si quis conventum velit Vel vitiosum vel sine vitio, vel probum vel inprobum.