'How can you drink aisy with that big nose on? said one gentleman. 'Go an be hangt! said I, in the true accent, applying myself again to the wine; with which the others laughed, and I pursued my supper in silence. There was a gentleman present who had seen the Lyndon party go off, with whom I had made a bet, which I lost; and the next morning I called upon him and paid it him.

Yet the t'other Gentleman commends it to the highest; though he is assured that he tasted a Glass in Master Empty Vessels Cellar that was far delicater, and that he would far esteem beyond this. Nevertheless he acknowledges this to be very good. But the pint being out, the first word is, Hangt, What goes upon one leg? Draws t'other pint of the same Wine.

Tere is no pot in hell teep enough to put him in! 'Ten tey must make haste and tig one, says herself; 'for she 'll pe hangt in a tay or two. So she 'll wake up, and beholt it was a tream!" "An' no sic an ill dream efter a', daddy!" said Malcolm. "Not an efil tream, my son, when it makes her aalmost wish that she hadn't peen quite killing ta tog!

The woman stopped. "What's yer wull, Maister Alec?" "Jist stan' there an' pu' this lassie oot. We're a' keepit in thegither, and nearhan' hungert." "The Lord preserve 's! I'll gang for the key." "Na, na; we wad hae to pay for that. Tak her oot that's a' we want." "He's a coorse crayter that maister o' yours. I wad gang to see him hangt."

Ye're ane o' thae mealy-mou'd frien's that like a man sae wel they wad raither hae him gang wi' his back to the pleuch, nor ca't i' the face o' a cauld win'. I wad raither see my frein' hangt nor see him deserve hangin'. Haud awa' wi' ye. Gin he disna gang, I'll gang mysel', an' I never was in a boat i' my life."

'Steal them, answered Shargar, struggling to get away from the grasp still upon his collar. 'We micht be hanged for that. 'Weel, Robert, I'll tak a' the wyte o' 't. Gin it hadna been for you, I micht ha' been hangt by this time for ill doin': for your sake I'll be hangt for weel doin', an' welcome. Ha! ha! ha!

Three months o' tongue-haudin', an' there's yer five poun'; an' Maister Soutar o' Duff Harbor 'ill pay 't intill yer ain han'. But brack troth wi' me, an' ye s' hear o' 't; for gien ye war hangt the warl' wad be a' the cleaner. Noo quit the hoose, an' never lat me see ye aboot the place again. But afore ye gang I gie ye fair warnin' 'at I mean to win at a' yer byganes."

The apostles and the first Christians, ye see, had to beir testimony to the fac' that the man that was hangt and dee'd upo the cross, the same was up again oot o' the grave, and gangin aboot the warl; noo I canna beir testimony to that, for I wasna at that time awaur o' onything; but I might weel be called upon to beir testimony to the fac' that, whaur ance he lay deid and beeried, there he's come alive at last that is, i' the sepulchre o' my hert!

Three months o' tongue haudin', an' there 's yer five poun'; an' Maister Soutar o' Duff Harbour 'ill pay 't intill yer ain han'. But brak troth wi' me, an' ye s' hear o' 't; for gien ye war hangt, the warl' wad be but the cleaner. Noo quit the hoose, an' never lat me see ye aboot the place again. But afore ye gang, I gie ye fair warnin' 'at I mean to win at a' yer byganes."

"She wantit me to get the puir laird to gang back till her; but I sair misdoobt, for a' her fine words, it 's a closed door, gien it bena a lid, she wad hae upon him; an' I wad suner be hangt nor hae a thoom i' that haggis." "Why should you doubt what a lady tells you?" "I wadna be ower ready, but I hae hard things, ye see, an' bude to be upo' my gaird."