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"Say, if they ain't jest like two dogs worritin' a bone you got me plumb beat," he said. Then he added with an air of outraged virtue: "I'd like to say right here she's jest playin' them fellers for their wads. Oh, she's a keen one, her eyes is right on to business. She'll sure have 'em shootin' each other right up. Seems to me a gal like that ain't no right in this yer city.

'Wot's the use o' worritin' 'bout these things? said Ortheris. 'You're bound to find all out quicker nor you want to, any'ow. He jerked the cartridge out of the breech-block into the palm of his hand. ''Ere's my chaplain, he said, and made the venomous black-headed bullet bow like a marionette. ''E's goin' to teach a man all about which is which, an' wot's true, after all, before sundown.

"She's just about as well as can be reasonably expected, sir, considerin' the way that she's been worritin' about you and Mr Hubert 'specially 'bout you, sir, since the news of the King of Spain's embargo have been made known," answered the man Tom, who was in fact the gardener and general handy man at The Nest, as Mrs Saint Leger's cottage was named.

I replied that I would have filled that fellow's hide so full of holes that it couldn't be stuffed with straw. "Well," said he slowly, "I kum purty nigh doin' it. But I jes' thought as how 'twan't Jim a shootin', but his jag, an' then I seemed ter see his kids a hangin' on th' gate a waitin' fer him t, come home, an' his wife a worritin' about him, an' I jis couldn,t do it.

But I swar to Gawd ef I'm pollutin' this airth on the day as sees Jake worritin' Miss Dianny, I'll perf'rate him till y' can't tell his dog-gone carkis from a parlor cinder-sifter." "Tell me how I can help, and count me in to the limit," said Tresler, catching, in his eagerness, something of the other's manner of expression.

And they couldn't get it away from him he tore it to pieces, worritin' it like 'twas a cat. He ought to be skinned alive, I say. It's low-down to keep such a dog." "If Peggy had obeyed " began Miss Margery. "Yessum," interrupted Mrs. Callahan. "And nobody's got any business to keep such a dog! We wouldn't 'a' had it happen for the world, ma'am.

Mebbe I'll pass over when I'm ready. It ain't jest ne'sary fer the likes o' us to yarn Gospel wi' one another, but I'm goin' to tell you somethin' as mebbe you're worritin' over jest 'bout now. It's 'bout a feller's gal his wife which the same that feller never did you no harm.

Y' ain't never sure when you're like to strike them chewed-up features o' his after nightfall. Y' see he's kind o' quit drinkin' leastways, he's frekent sober. Mebbe he can't sleep easy. Ther's suthin' worritin' his head, sure. He 'pears ter me desp'rate restless kind o' like an old hoss wi' the bush-ticks. Et don't fit noways wi' the Joe Nelson I oncet knew. Mebbe it's religion.

"I hain't worritin' about his dealin' with you; it's your dealin' with him I'm questionin' into." "I'd . He wouldn't be sorry." "Um!... Nate Weaver, back country a spell, is lookin' fer a wife. Hain't young. Got lots of money, and the right woman could weasel it out of him. Lots of it.... He'd like you fine.

"It's so long since I've been used to a missus," she said, when announcing her decision to Mr. Sheldon, "I doubt if I could do with Miss Georgy's finnickin ways. I should feel tewed like, if she came into the kitchen, worritin' and asking questions. I've been used to my own ways, and I don't suppose I could do with hers."