They're almost as friendly as dogs if you know how to get on with 'em. Watch him peckin' about there an' lookin' round at us now an' again. He knows we're talkin' about him." It was the queerest thing in the world to see the old fellow. He looked at the plump little scarlet-waistcoated bird as if he were both proud and fond of him. "He's a conceited one," he chuckled.

No, the far better way was to see as little of her as possible, to meet almost as strangers, and then to part for ever. Difficult as this programme assuredly was, it seemed the only honorable course left me. Even had she loved me as truly as I did her, I could yet do no less. "They seem to be peckin' away pretty lively out in front," said the corporal, interrupting my reverie. "Yes," I admitted.

"He means ge-ol-o-gist," said the old man, who had no little trouble with the right word himself. "A feller come in here three year ago with a hammer an' went to peckin' aroun' in the rocks here, an' that boy was with him all the time. Thar don't seem to be much the feller didn't tell Jason an' nothin' that Jason don't seem to remember.

"Hit wuz wunner dese yer uppity little Jack Sparrers, I speck," said the old man; "dey wuz allers bodder'n' longer udder fokes's bizness, en dey keeps at it down ter dis day peckin' yer, en pickin' dar, en scratchin' out yander. One day, atter he bin fool by ole Brer Tarrypin, Brer Rabbit wuz settin' down in de woods studyin' how he wuz gwineter git even.

"I'm kind o' silly, mother, but I can't help it you look so temptin'," said Samson. "She looks like an angel," said Harry, as he improved his chance to embrace and kiss the lady of the cabin. "The wind has been peckin' at us all day," said Samson. "But it's worth it to get back home and see your face and this blazin' fire." "And the good, hot supper," said Harry, as they sat down at the table.

In the early spring the old man had disappeared into the mountain with powder, drills, and a three months' grub-stake. He had told no one of his destination, and when he had returned the most he would say was that he had "been peckin' on a ledge all summer." He sent samples of his rock outside but did not show the assays.

He remembered hearing people laugh and joke about the new jail. No less a person than Cap' Redberry had said, after a casual inspection of the calaboose, that if THAT was what they called a jail he'd hate to be inside of it if a woodpecker started to peckin' at it, 'cause if such a thing happened the whole blamed she-bang would cave in and like as not hurt him considerable.

I've got it an' Spot's got it you can tell by the way he won't trouble to git mad with the chickens that come peckin' around him. As soon as it's safely spread over you, you begin to see that the last thing to jedge anybody by is what you've known of the outside of 'em."

Oh! you haven't been peckin' at one another yet?" Mrs. Berry exclaimed. Ripton interposed to tell her such fears were unfounded. "Then how long ha' you been divided?" In a guilty voice Ripton stammered "since September." "September!" breathed Mrs. Berry, counting on her fingers, "September, October, Nov two months and more! nigh three!

Oh! you haven't been peckin' at one another yet?" Mrs. Berry exclaimed. Ripton interposed to tell her such fears were unfounded. "Then how long ha' you been divided?" In a guilty voice Ripton stammered "since September." "September!" breathed Mrs. Berry, counting on her fingers, "September, October, Nov two months and more! nigh three!