Ruskin when he says that Scott "never knew 'l'amor che move 'l sol e l' altre stelle." He whose heart was "broken for two years," and retained the crack till his dying day, he who, when old and tired, and near his death, was yet moved by the memory of the name which thirty years before he had cut in Runic characters on the turf at the Castle-gate of St.

But our time was come. The moon had set. I hung the half of the ropes by Father Balbi's neck on one side and his clothes on the other. I did the same to myself, and with our hats on and our coats off we went to the opening. E quindi uscimmo a rimirar le stelle.

There, too, in those long, solitary vigils, the Spirit of God came upon him, and the spirit of Nature was even as God's Spirit, and he sang: 'Laudato sia Dio mio Signore, con tutte le creature, specialmente messer lo frate sole; per suor luna, e per le stelle; per frate vento e per l'aire, e nuvolo, e sereno e ogni tempo. Half the value of this hymn would be lost were we to forget how it was written, in what solitudes and mountains far from men, or to ticket it with some abstract word like Pantheism.

Bill, Joe, all the great lunking farm hands seemed somehow uplifted, carried out of their everyday selves, ennobled by some deep-seated emotion, and I was eager for a chance to show that I, too, could balance and bow and pay court to women, but alas, I never did, I kept to my corner even though Stelle Gilbert came to drag me out.

But our time was come. The moon had set. I hung the half of the ropes by Father Balbi's neck on one side and his clothes on the other. I did the same to myself, and with our hats on and our coats off we went to the opening. E quindi uscimmo a rimirar le stelle.

"Tanto ch'io vidi delle cose belle Che porta il ciel, per un pertugio tondo, E quindi uscimmo a riveder le stelle." A riveder le stelle I closed my eyes, opened them again, and lo! the stars were gone. In their place shone pale dawn, touching the grey-white arch of a tilt-waggon, on the floor of which I lay in a deep litter of straw.

Such as these must Guarini have apostrophised, as he looked at his slumbering love. "Occhi! stelle mortale! Ministri de miei mali! Se chiusi m'uccidete, Aperti, che farete?" Or, as Clarendon Gage translated it. "Ye mortal stars! ye eyes that, e'en in sleep, Can thus my senses chain'd in wonder keep, Say, if when closed, your beauties thus I feel, Oh, what when open, would ye not reveal?"

Impatient to rove in the equinoctial regions, I could not raise my eyes to the starry firmament without thinking of the Southern Cross, and recalling the sublime passage of Dante, which the most celebrated commentators have applied to that constellation: Io mi volsi a man' destra e posi mente All' altro polo, e vidi quattro stelle Non viste mai fuorch' alla prima gente.

To produce such a revolution, divine how I must have been fascinated! and be not surprised at my repeating all the way that pathetic sonnet of Petrarch: "O giorno, o ora, o ultimo momento, O stelle congiurate a 'mpoverirme! O fido sguardo, or che volei tu dirme, Partend' io, per non esser mai contento?" September 9th. You may imagine how I felt when the hour of leaving Padua drew near.

"And then we came forth to behold again the Stars;" and who came from his ascent through purifying Purgatory with Rifatto si, come piante novelle Rinnovellate di novella fronda, Puro e disposto a salire alle stelle "So made anew, like young plants in spring with fresh foliage, I was pure and disposed to come forth among the Stars;" and who must end his Paradiso and his life-work announcing