The physical thing, for instance this table, is indeed different from my mental memory idea of a table, inasmuch as every possible subject can experience this table while my mental memory image belongs to me alone.

I remember a lad of our own age who died, leaping from the wall, and then there were our adventures along the river. Another terrible memory was associated with the cathedral. I had begun my first year of Latin, and was exactly nine at the time. We had come out of the Institute, and were watching a funeral.

Those whom you call your enemies are those who love the memory of your father and brothers, whom you ought to have loved more than they do." "But those who have sought my death," she replied, "are my enemies, are they not, and is it not a Christian act to forgive them?"

But if it should be good, he may receive an unearned blessing of abundance not only in his basket, but also in his head and his heart, his memory and his fancy.

The lack was overwhelming physical power not mentality and not art. At "No tears but of my shedding" Henry Irving's Shylock took a strong clutch upon the emotions and created an effect that will never be forgotten. Ellen Terry's Portia long ago became a precious memory.

She saw also, in that single look, that he was well-known, for several were saluting him at once. What could it mean? It must be the G. B. of the Temple! Should she stop and challenge his pursuit? The obstacle to this was a certain sinking at the heart accounted for by an old memory. She must elude him instead.

Seeing the tears fall from his eyes, while he was thus eulogising her whose memory I shall ever venerate, I almost forgave him the mischief of his imprudence, which led to her untimely end. I therefore carefully avoided wounding his few gray hairs and latter days, and left him still untold that it was by her, of whom he thought so highly, that his uncontradicted treachery had been discovered.

It is highly probable that all the examples given under this head are really quotations from memory. This again is common; e.g. Luke iv. 19; John xv. 25, xix. 36; Acts xiii. 22; Rom. iii. 11-18, ix. 33, xi. 8; 1 Pet. ii. 24.

Occasionally, as some of the extraordinary feats related of the person before him occurred to his memory, he turned his eyes in the direction of the great pioneer, and at each time observed the gaze of the woodsman fixed upon him. Nevertheless his habitual listlessness was not disturbed, and he pursued his peculiar train of reflections.

"My own lord!" said Sibyll, with grateful tears in confiding eyes; but, after a pause, she added timidly, "Does the king still bear so stern a memory against so humble a subject?" "The king is more wroth than before, since tidings of Lord Warwick's restless machinations in France have soured his temper.