On the other hand, I " The tribune faltered. "Perpol!" he continued, resolutely. "I am too old to submit to dishonor. In Rome, let them tell how Quintus Arrius, as became a Roman tribune, went down with his ship in the midst of the foe. This is what I would have thee do. If the galley prove a pirate, push me from the plank and drown me. Dost thou hear? Swear thou wilt do it."

"It is enough," he said aloud. "Go back to thy place." Ben-Hur bowed; looked once more into the master's face, but saw nothing for hope. He turned away slowly, looked back, and said, "If thou dost think of me again, O tribune, let it not be lost in thy mind that I prayed thee only for word of my people mother, sister." He moved on. Arrius followed him with admiring eyes. "Perpol!" he thought.

Perpol! in the fight the duumvir then but a tribune lost his galley. A returning vessel found him and one other all of the crew who survived afloat upon the same plank. I give you now the story of the rescuers, which hath this excellence at least it hath never been contradicted. They say, the duumvir's companion on the plank was a Jew " "A Jew!" echoed Messala. "And a slave." "How Drusus?

"I would you could endure your own troubles," retorted the other, "and let me care for mine!" "Perpol, friend," replied Antonius, "don't be vexed! I see it is a case of your wanting little said on a sore point. Well, keep silent, I won't tease you. Doesn't Theognis declare: "'Caress me not with words, while far away Thy heart is absent and thy feelings stray'? Elton, translator.

"Are you mad, fellow?" bawled Agias, while the porter, grasping him by the one hand, and the dim lamp by the other, dragged him into the house. "Do you know who I am? or what my business is? Do you want to have your master murdered?" "Perpol! Not in the least. That's why I do as I do. Tell your story to Falto. Eho! What's that you've got under your cloak?"

When the games were over, Gabinius struggled through the crowd after the Vestal, and kept near to her until she had reached her litter and the eight red-liveried Cappadocian porters bore her away. Gabinius continued to gaze after her until Fabia drew the leather curtains of her conveyance and was hid from sight. "Perpol!" reflected Gabinius. "How utterly enslaved I am!"

"He had observed that the men who are confined to one side become misshapen. He also said that some day of storm or battle there might be sudden need to change him, and he might then be unserviceable." "Perpol! The idea is new. What else hast thou observed of him?" "He is cleanly above his companions." "In that he is Roman," said Arrius, approvingly. "Have you nothing of his history?"

"I shall; and be rid of it!" The woman smiled sarcastically. "And scorn it for thyself?" Aquila made no answer, but rode on in sulky silence. "Perpol, it must be pleasant to be a queen," the woman observed with an assumption of childishness in her voice. "Peril's own habit!" Aquila declared. "Peril! Fie! That is half the pleasure of this game of life.

"You are over sober to-night," said Antonius, when this scarcely elaborate meal was nearly finished. "Perpol!" replied Drusus, "have I been as a rule drunken of late? My throat hardly knows the feeling of good Falernian, it is so long since I have tasted any." "I doubt if there is so much as a draught of posca in the army," said Antonius, yawning.

Everything was cool, still, and dark. Only through a single aperture shot a clear ray of sunlight, and stretched in a radiant bar across the gaudy carpets. Lucius stumbled, half groping, into a chair, and seated himself. Cornelia had never received him thus before. What was she preparing? Another moment and Lentulus Crus entered the darkened hall. "Perpol!