Gridley, you've seen them millers fly round and round a candle, and you know how it ginerally comes out. Men is men and gals is gals. I would n't trust no man, not ef he was much under a hundred year old, and as for a gal !" "Mulieri ne mortuae quidem credendum est," said Mr. Gridley. "You wouldn't trust a woman even if she was dead, hey, Nurse?"

"You would n't admire her, if you knew what she wrote here about you," said Fanny, whose eyes had strayed to the written page opposite, and lingered there long enough to read something that excited her curiosity. "What is it?" asked Tom, forgetting his honorable resolves for a minute. "She says, 'I try to like Tom, and when he is pleasant we do very well; but he don't stay so long.

Great books, little books, old books, new books, all sorts of books. He great scholar, I tell you." "Has n't he some curiosities, old figures, old jewelry, old coins, or things of that sort?" Paolo looked at the young man cautiously, almost suspiciously. "He don't keep no jewels nor no money in his chamber.

Peter looked at her and then, quickly, for caution's sake, looked elsewhere. "But there were other things to be taken into account," he said. The Duchessa raised her eyes. "What other things?" they gravely questioned. "Would n't his telling her have been equivalent to a declaration of love?" questioned he, looking at the signet-ring on the little finger of his left hand. "A declaration of love?"

She could not explain the feeling; but she was glad when the play was done, and they were safe at home, where kind grandma was waiting to see them comfortably into bed. "Did you have a good time, dear?" she asked, looking at Polly's feverish cheeks and excited eyes. "I don't wish to be rude, but I did n't," answered Polly.

I c'd marry him without waitin' for father, too, 'cause a minister could n't in reason find fault over another man's bein' always to home. O' course he would n't be still like father is, but I ain't never been one to look gift-horses in the mouth, 'n' I d'n' know 's I 'd ought to expect another man jus' like father in one life.

It's this afternoon 's the butcher 'n' the man 's mends church spires 's comin' together to get the cow out o' the mill-wheel. The whole c'mmunity 's goin' down to look on, 'n' I can't see no good 'n' s'fficient reason why you should n't go too. I 'll help you dress, 'n' we 'll scurry along right now. 'F we meet Mr.

This was a blow, for they had just begun, and Polly had n't the face to send in a bill for a whole quarter, though her plans and calculations were sadly disturbed by the failure of that sum. Trudging home to dinner, tired and disappointed, poor Polly received another blow, which hurt her more than the loss of all her pupils.

Well, he is, so you need n't laugh, for we 've made all our plans," said Maud with comical dignity as she tried the effect of an old white bonnet, wondering if farmers' wives could wear ostrich feathers when they went to meeting. "Blessed innocence! Don't you wish you were a child, and dared tell what you want?" murmured Fanny.

"But, hang it all, people don't go a-gypsying with French maids!" "Why not?" she demanded. She asked the question quite honestly. He had forgotten Marie utterly until this moment, and she seemed to join the party like an intruder. Always she would be upon the back seat. "Wouldn't you feel freer without her?" he asked. "I should n't feel at all proper," she declared.