"Well, th' way he must be poundin' his ear now notta hear dis racket yud think he was trainin' for a Rip van Winkle Marathon." Pause made audible by the pertinacious bell, grinding away like a dentist's drill in a vacant tooth.... "Waitin' here all day won't get me nothin'. Here, what's th' matta wid you signin' for't?" "G'wan. Sign it yourself 'nd stick unda the door, whydoncha?"

She had a way o' grabbin' me by de years an' shovin' my haid twixt her knees whilst she wuk on me sumpin' awful. No wonder I was scairt o' dese frammin's. I reckon dat was de cause o' me goin' t' sea. Ah mas' tell you 'bout dat. "One day my mammy gimme fifteen cents an' say 'Go down to de market and fetch me some fish. Ah' lissen don't you let no grass grew unda yo' feet.

Kundoo was a great workman, and did his best not to get drunk, because, when he had saved forty rupees, Unda was to steal everything that she could find in Janki's house and run with Kundoo to a land where there were no mines, and every one kept three fat bullocks and a milch-buffalo. While this scheme ripened it was his custom to drop in upon Janki and worry him about the oil-savings.

Men had run over from Five with astounding news, and the foremen could not hold their gangs together. Presently, surrounded by a clamorous crew, Gangs Rahim, Mogul, and Janki, and ten basket-women, walked up to report themselves, and pretty little Unda stole away to Janki's hut to prepare his evening meal. "Alone I found the way," explained Janki Meah, "and now will the Company give me pension?"

She'll chuck herself down the shaft in a minute," shouted the Manager. But he need not have troubled; Unda was afraid of Death. She wanted Kundoo. The Assistant was watching the flood and seeing how far he could wade into it. There was a lull in the water, and the whirlpool had slackened. The mine was full, and the people at the pit-bank howled.

Janki was in my veranda all this morning, telling me that Kundoo had eloped with his wife Unda or Anda, I think her name was. 'Hillo! And those were the cattle that you risked your life to clear out of Twenty-Two! 'No I was thinking of the Company's props, not the Company's men. 'Sounds better to say so now; but I don't believe you, old fellow.

She'll chuck herself down the shaft in a minute, shouted the Manager. But he need not have troubled; Unda was afraid of Death. She wanted Kundoo. The Assistant was watching the flood and seeing how far he could wade into it. There was a lull in the water, and the whirlpool had slackened. The mine was full, and the people at the pit-bank howled.

All cowherds are popularly supposed to be cattle lifters, and a putwarrie after he has got over the stage of infancy, and has been indoctrinated into all the knavery that his elders can teach him, is supposed to belong to the highest category of villains. A popular proverb, much used in Behar, says: 'Unda poortee, Cowa maro! Iinnum me, billar: Bara burris me, Kayashh marige!! Humesha mara gwar!!

Kundoo, doubting, drove the pick, but the first soft crush of the coal was a call to him. He was fighting for his life and for Unda pretty little Unda with rings on all her toes for Unda and the forty rupees.

They would all go to their homes to-morrow. Where were their men? Little Unda, her cloth drenched with the rain, stood at the pit-mouth calling down the shaft for Kundoo. They had swung the cages clear of the mouth, and her only answer was the murmur of the flood in the pit's eye two hundred and sixty feet below. 'Look after that woman!