Schofield resumed her fond smile. "YOU'RE all right, little boysie!" she said heartily. Then, picking up the bottle, she replenished the tablespoon, and told Penrod something she had considered it undiplomatic to mention before. "Here's the other one," she said sweetly. "Uuf!" he sputtered. "Other uh what?" "Two tablespoons before each meal," she informed him.

Racey looked over his shoulder toward the house. Then he got to his feet and strode across the garden to where Swing Tunstall sat his horse. "Swing," said he, quietly, "are you busy just now?" Swing, suspecting a catch somewhere, stared in swift suspicion. "Why uh no," was his cautious reply. "Then go off some'ers and die."

He smiled sourly at me. "I've held my own with this bunch uh trouble-hunters for thirty years," he said dryly. "I guess yuh ain't got any reason t' be alarmed. Come out uh that corner and let 'em alone." I don't, to this day, know why I did it, but I quit hugging old King, and the other two fell back and gave me a clear path to the door.

So say we'll allow now let me see, ten plus ten is twenty, and one six-hundredth of twenty would be six in two is no, two in six is well, anyway, to make it ab-so-lute-ly safe, we'll allow a cent and a half for each sandwich, to cover overhead and rent and fuel, and then they sell a sandwich at fifteen cents, which is, uh, the way they figure percentage of profit well, make it, say, seven hundred per cent.! 'Course just estimating roughly like.

"Uh course," he added grimly, "he MIGHT be viewin' the scenery but it's dang pore weather fur pleasure-ridin', now I'm tellin' ye! Them a comin' up here don't look good to ME, Luck 'n' if they ain't " "How do you know it's the sheriff?" Luck for no reason whatever felt a sudden heaviness of spirit. "Hey? Think my eyes is failin' me?" Applehead gave him a sidelong glance of hasty indignation.

Pollock's tonight." "Say, uh, what'd you think of them? Didn't Dillon strike you as pretty light-waisted?" "Why no. He seemed intelligent. I'm sure he's much more wide-awake than our dentist." "Well now, the old man is a good dentist. He knows his business. And Dillon I wouldn't cuddle up to the Dillons too close, if I were you.

"I 'low, honey," an old woman had said, "she'll mek his heart ache many a time. She'll comb his haid wid a three-legged stool an' bresh it wid de broom. Uh, huh putty, is she? You ma'y huh 'cause she putty. Ki-yi! She fix you! Putty women fu' putty tricks." And the old hag smacked her lips over the spice of malevolence in her words.

"She can't come here an' take all I've got an' never give me a thankye for it. I'm shet uh her, anyway." She twisted again and yet again, till the picture was a handful of ragged scraps of cardboard. Then she raised herself to an elbow and flung the fragments far from her and lay down again with glum satisfaction. Her fingers touched the other picture, which had slid to the couch.

Poor soul, he was hot, but he did wear me out." "Uh You usually want to get out. Like to walk down to the lake shore? Come on, let's go to the movies! Or shall we jump in the car and run out to Sam's, for a swim?" "If you don't mind, dear, I'm afraid I'm rather tired." "Why don't you sleep down-stairs tonight, on the couch? Be cooler. I'm going to bring down my mattress. Come on!

I ain't a liar, and I can lick the darned son-of-a-gun that calls me one. I ain't, and yuh can't say I am, unless yuh lie worse'n Andy." "Calm down," urged Weary pacifically. "Jack said yuh could lie; he didn't say " "By gracious, you'd think I was necked up with a whole bunch uh George Washingtons!" growled Andy, half-indignantly.