It would not be prudent to send a letter written in foreign characters otherwise than by the mission courier, and were I to use Chinese writing it might be read on the way. Chi Fu partook of another half bowl of rice, and then continued: 'Therefore it would be advisable to make some plan for the escape of the two young ladies, and receive them here. 'But what plan? cried his mother.

"Oh, you kin 'pend on me, Mis' Mo'ton; fu' when I sets out to save money I kin save, I tell you." Polly was not usually so sanguine, but what changes will not the notion of the possession of a brown silk dress trimmed with passementrie make in the disposition of a woman?

"That's my business," said Dumbiedikes; "ye wad say naething about that if ye werena a fule and yet I like ye the better for't ae wise body's eneugh in the married state. But if your heart's ower fu', take what siller will serve ye, and let it be when ye come back again as gude syne as sune."

Edward could collect nothing from him, excepting that the Laird of Balmawhapple had gone home yesterday morning 'wi' his boots fu' o' bluid. In the garden, however, he met the old butler, who no longer attempted to conceal that, having been bred in the nursery line with Sumack and Co. of Newcastle, he sometimes wrought a turn in the flower- borders to oblige the Laird and Miss Rose.

Paris, 1637, folio, p. 196. Gibbon's History may also be consulted, vol. x. p. 231. Villehardouin, in describing the siege of Constantinople, A. D. 1203, says, "'Li murs fu mult garnis d'Anglois et de Danois," hence the dissertation of Ducange here quoted, and several articles besides in his Glossarium, as Varangi, Warengangi, &c.

"Cindy Ann," he said, "you a fool, you ain't got no mo' pride den a guinea hen, an' you got a heap less sense. W'y, befo' I go to ol' Mas' Sam Brabant fu' a cent, I'd sta've out in de road." "Huh!" said Cindy Ann, shutting her mouth on her impatience. One gets tired of thinking and saying how much more sense a woman has than a man when she comes in where his sense stops and his pride begins.

"Tu Fu," Translated. Taken from Mrs. Headland's note-book. One day a eunuch dashed into the back gate of our compound in Peking, rode up to the door of the library, dismounted from his horse, and handed a letter in a red envelope to the house servant who met him on the steps. "What is the matter?" asked the boy. "The Princess is ill," replied the servant.

Come now, don’t be a baby take courage. It will all seem quite different by and by, when the sun shines.” A knock at the door was followed by the entrance of a young colored boy carrying an armful of wood. “Miss T’rèse sont me kin’le fiar fu’ Miss Hosma; ’low he tu’nin’ cole,” he said depositing his load on the hearth; and Fanny, drying her eyes, turned to watch him at his work.

Hamilton," said Skaggs, shaking his hand heartily. Berry did not answer. What had this slim, glib young man to do with him? What had any white man to do with him after what he had suffered at their hands? "You know you are to go New York with me?" "To New Yawk? What fu'?"

'Hold on a little longer! Yet his will had been sapped by the long hours of the night and the terror of the dawn; and courage, which with him had rested only on the sands of ostentation, had crumbled long ago. "I turned away, overcome by a sickening sensation; I couldn't look longer. Lee Fu waited tensely, peering ahead and to windward with lightning glances. A wave caught us, flung us forward.