"Vladimir Doktorenko," said Lebedeff's nephew briskly, and with a certain pride, as if he boasted of his name. "Keller," murmured the retired officer. "Hippolyte Terentieff," cried the last-named, in a shrill voice. They sat now in a row facing the prince, and frowned, and played with their caps.

Terentieff," interrupted Gania. "Don't excite yourself; you seem very ill, and I am sorry for that.

'I shall attack my uncle about it tomorrow morning, and I'm very glad you told me the story. But how was it that you thought of coming to me about it, Terentieff? "'So much depends upon your uncle, I said. 'And besides we have always been enemies, Bachmatoff; and as you are a generous sort of fellow, I thought you would not refuse my request because I was your enemy! I added with irony.

"'Why, what on earth can have possessed you to come and see ME, Terentieff? he cried, with his usual pleasant, sometimes audacious, but never offensive familiarity, which I liked in reality, but for which I also detested him. 'Why what's the matter? he cried in alarm. 'Are you ill? "That confounded cough of mine had come on again; I fell into a chair, and with difficulty recovered my breath.

Why do you keep laughing at me?" said Hippolyte irritably to Evgenie Pavlovitch, who certainly was laughing. "I only want to know, Mr. Hippolyte excuse me, I forget your surname." "Mr. Terentieff," said the prince. "Oh yes, Mr. Terentieff. Thank you prince. I heard it just now, but had forgotten it. I want to know, Mr. Terentieff, if what I have heard about you is true.

But it was more serious than he wished to think. As soon as the visitors had crossed the low dark hall, and entered the narrow reception-room, furnished with half a dozen cane chairs, and two small card-tables, Madame Terentieff, in the shrill tones habitual to her, continued her stream of invectives. "Are you not ashamed? Are you not ashamed? You barbarian! You tyrant!

"It seems to me that all you and your friends have said, Mr. Terentieff, and all you have just put forward with such undeniable talent, may be summed up in the triumph of right above all, independent of everything else, to the exclusion of everything else; perhaps even before having discovered what constitutes the right. I may be mistaken?"

Terentieff," said Ptitsin, who had bidden the prince good-night, and was now holding out his hand to Hippolyte; "I think you remark in that manuscript of yours, that you bequeath your skeleton to the Academy. Are you referring to your own skeleton I mean, your very bones?" "Yes, my bones, I " "Quite so, I see; because, you know, little mistakes have occurred now and then. There was a case "

Lebedeff's nephew, whom the reader has seen already, accompanied him, and also the youth named Hippolyte Terentieff. The latter was only seventeen or eighteen. He had an intelligent face, though it was usually irritated and fretful in expression.

The three climbed up the long staircase until they reached the fourth floor where Madame Terentieff lived. "You intend to introduce the prince?" asked Colia, as they went up. "Yes, my boy. I wish to present him: General Ivolgin and Prince Muishkin! But what's the matter?... what?... How is Marfa Borisovna?" "You know, father, you would have done much better not to come at all!