Madame de Bergenheim seemed very busily occupied with a piece of tapestry in her lap; but the slow manner in which her needle moved, and the singular mistakes she made, showed that her mind was far away from the flowers she was working. She had just finished a beautiful dark lily, which contrasted strangely with its neighbors, when a servant entered.

It is, however, true that most scholars have no compunction in exposing each other's mistakes, and that their austere zeal sometimes finds expression in harsh and overbearing language. Barring the harshness they are quite right.

"Suppose we go over to the club." "All right. Wait a moment." Henry stepped into Miss Drury's room. "You must; forgive me," he said, in a low tone. "What for?" she asked, in surprise. "For so rudely inviting you to dinner when my sister had not even called on you." "Oh, that's nothing," she replied, laughing. "Such mistakes are common enough with men, I should think." "Not with sensible men.

"But no matter after you, your father and your father's affairs shall be my first consideration. You will let me see you sometimes, won't you?" "Sometimes," Gladys laughed. "Good-bye! Don't make any mistakes to-morrow. Your performance to-night was not as good as usual." And, with this somewhat cruel remark, she stepped lightly into her motor, and drove off. Shiel now gave way to despair.

So these grand folks would ask in my son-in-law's ear, 'Who may that gentleman be? 'The father-in-law with the money bags; he is very rich. 'The devil, he is! they would say, and look again at me with the respect due to my money. Well, if I was in the way sometimes, I paid dearly for my mistakes. And besides, who is perfect? She looked at me, and that glance of hers opened all my veins.

True it was that my eye was preternaturally keen for flaws of language, not from pedantic exaction of superfluous accuracy, but, on the contrary, from too conscientious a wish to escape the mistakes which language not rigorous is apt to occasion.

Then there was the other thing the thing he scarcely dared think of in the presence of this pure young girl the disagreeable case of Marie but there was no use reflecting over what could not be helped. A man ought to be pardoned for mistakes due to uncontrollable natural passion.

I have made mistakes enough in conversation and print. I never find them out until they are stereotyped, and then I think they rarely escape me. I have no doubt I shall make half a dozen slips before this breakfast is over, and remember them all before another.

They can always sway the people through fear." Bruce laughed again. "Either Kathlyn Hare will be free to-morrow or Umballa and the council meat for the jackals . . . or I shall be," he added, in afterthought. "Now, do not speak till I speak. I wish to think, for I've got to act quickly; I can't make any mistakes when I get there."

So innumerable are the mistakes, which the smattering of ignorant native interpreters never fails to occasion, that they despaired of obtaining any accurate information on any of those heads. Perhaps few despots sully their dignity, by condescending to consult the inclination of their subjects, in personally communicating to them their most private as well as public concerns.