You see," added the squire, as if he felt there was some apology due for this generosity to an object whom he professed to consider so ungrateful, "her husband was a faithful servant, and so I wish you would not stand there staring me out of countenance, but go down to the woman at once, or Stirn will have let the land to Rickeybockey, as sure as a gun.

Hazeldean that Frank was in love with Violante Rickeybockey?" "I! Never, sir! I feared, on the contrary, that he was somewhat enamoured of a very different person. I hinted at that possibility. I could not do more, for I did not know how far Frank's affections were seriously engaged. And indeed, sir, Mrs.

But Violante is so handsome, that I don't wonder at the boy's choice; and then it is our fault, we let them see so much of each other as children. However, I should be very angry if Rickeybockey had been playing sly, and running away from the Casino in order to give Frank an opportunity to carry on a clandestine intercourse with his daughter."

He is merely the passive agent in the affair, the unregarded cause of the general satisfaction. It was not Riccabocca himself that they approved and blessed, it was the gentleman in the white waistcoat who had made Miss Jemima Madam Rickeybockey!

Hazeldean will forgive him if he is only a doctor probably of Laws and not, as most foreigners pretend to be, a marquis or a baron at least." "As to that," cried the squire, "It is the best thing I know about Rickeybockey that he don't attempt to humbug us by any such foreign trumpery.

Doctor! my aunt married a Doctor of Divinity excellent man wore a wig and was made a dean! So long as Rickeybockey is not a doctor of physic, I don't care a button. If he's that, indeed, it would be suspicious; because, you see, those foreign doctors of physic are quacks, and tell fortunes, and go about on a stage with a Merry-Andrew." "Lord!

Nevertheless, as it was impossible for the squire, however huffed, to bear malice, he now and then reminded Riccabocca of his existence by presents of game, and would have called on him more often than he did, but that Riccabocca received him with such excessive politeness that the blunt country gentleman felt shy and put out, and used to say that "to call on Rickeybockey was as bad as going to Court."

The squire gets up to stretch his legs, and, the insinuation against his hospitality recurring to his thoughts, calls out to his wife, "Write to Rickeybockey to-morrow yourself, Harry, and ask him to come and spend two or three days here. There, Mrs. Dale, you hear me?" "Yes," said Mrs. Dale, putting her hands to her ears in implied rebuke at the loudness of the squire's tone.

Those soles seemed to him optical delusions, phantoms of the overheated brain; but now, catching hold of Stirn, while the parson in equal astonishment caught hold of him, the squire faltered out, "Well, this beats cock-fighting! The man's as mad as a March hare, and has taken Dr. Rickeybockey for Little Lenny!"

Please to speak plainly, ma'am." Mrs. "It was of Mounseer, as you call him, that I spoke, Mr. Hazeldean." SQUIRE. "What! Rickeybockey?" "Signor Riccabocca." "Are we playing at whist, or are we not?" The squire, who is fourth player, drops the king to Captain Higginbotham's lead of the ace of hearts.