At the opposite window a little white-robed figure leant out, whose golden curls shone in the starlight. "William," she whispered, "I threw some beads to see if you were awake. Were your folks mad?" "Awful," said William laconically. "Mine were too. I di'n't care, did you?" "No, I di'n't. Not a bit!" "William, wasn't it fun? I wish it was just beginning again, don't you?" "Yes, I jus' do.

"Das true, massa, but you di'n't promise to wait for him for eber an' eber!" "Not quite; but of course I meant that I would wait a reasonable time." The negro appeared to meditate for some moments on the extent of a "reasonable" time, for his huge eyes became huger as he gazed frowningly at the ground. Then he spoke.

"You wasn't innercent dat time, Quashy." "I di'n't say I was, Sooz'n, but I cou'n't help it. Well, Massa Lawrence, who's too much of a man to remain orkerd long, goes up to Miss Manuela wid a leetle smile, an' holds out his hand. She shakes it quite gently-like, zif dey was on'y noo acquaintances jest interdooced. Ob course I di'n't hear rightly all dey said "

"That is the Bible. I do not know what the Tee Albare is!" Frowenfeld darted an aroused glance into the ever-courteous eyes of his visitor, who said without a motion: "You di'n't gave Agricola Fusilier une ouangan, la nuit passé?" "Sir?" "Ee was yeh? laz nighd?" "Mr. Fusilier was here last night yes. He had been attacked by an assassin and slightly wounded.

I felt awful hot, an' I di'n't like Cuthbert." He appeared to think this sufficient explanation, though he was fully prepared for the want of sympathy displayed by his family. "Well," he said firmly, "I'd just like to see you do it, I'd just like to see you be in the head and that ole rug an' have to say stupid things an' an' see folks you don't like, an' I bet you'd do something."

What do you mean?" "I mean dat you an' me's out for a holiday two slabes out for a holiday! T'ink ob dat!" The negro threw back his head, opened his capacious jaws, and gave vent to an almost silent chuckle. "That does indeed mound strange," returned Foster; "how has such a wonderful event been brought about?" "By lub, Geo'ge. Di'n't I tell you before dat hub am eberyt'ing?"

Di'n't I tell you I was born an' raised among de Andes in Sout' Ameriky?" "To be sure, I forgot that, but there must be a considerable difference between the two mountain ranges." "Das troo, massa, but de diff'rence don't make much diff'rence to de legs.

"Das true, massa, but you di'n't promise to wait for him for eber an' eber!" "Not quite; but of course I meant that I would wait a reasonable time." The negro appeared to meditate for some moments on the extent of a "reasonable" time, for his huge eyes became huger as he gazed frowningly at the ground. Then he spoke.

"And, any way, he got copped di'n't he? or he'd not of been in prison, so there!" "He di'n't get copped fust go. It was jus' a sorter mistake, he said. He said it wun't happen again. He's a jolly good stealer. The cops said he was and they oughter know." "Well," said William changing the conversation, "what d'you want for Christmas?"

She nodded understandingly. "I don't mind!" she said sweetly. "I'll like you jus' as much if you don't ever give me any rock." William blushed. "I di'n't know you liked me," he said. "I do," she said fervently. "I like your face an' I like the things you say." William had forgotten to scowl. He was one flaming mixture of embarrassment and delight.