"Listen," he went on, "you are continually complaining of poverty; I come to your house your house, mind you, not your rooms, and I find the /debris/ of a card party lying about. I see champagne bottles freshly opened there in the corner. I see a dressing gown on the sofa that must have cost twenty or thirty pounds.

The young lady's friends were capable of receiving more harm than the maid could inflict upon her acquaintances. There would be callers again during the day and evening, and she did not wish to see them. Their society now would be like a glass of champagne from which the life had effervesced.

He had taken a little champagne before dinner, a moderate allowance of wine in the course of the meal, and two rather liberal tumblers of whisky-and-soda with Ralston. This was not the direction in which he was accustomed to approach excess, but he remembered gladly that he had a carafe of brandy in the room.

I don't believe I can explain it; but there are quantities of champagne and men and principally girls; but they're not girls at all, if you see what I mean, not by several accidents. It would have been splendid, but I got sick, and it turned into a ghastly mess, mostly in the cab. That was rather thick, wasn't it?"

"Drink it up; you positively must drink the brandy, and then seltzer water and a lot of lemon," said Yashvin, standing over Petritsky like a mother making a child take medicine, "and then a little champagne just a small bottle." "Come, there's some sense in that. Stop a bit, Vronsky. We'll all have a drink." "No; good-bye all of you. I'm not going to drink today." "Why, are you gaining weight?

Scarcely had he arrived in Champagne when he heard of the retaking of Lagny and Corbeil. So soon as his back was turned, the League thus showed its impotence to retain the advantage which his genius had won. Corbeil, which had cost him a month of hard work, was recaptured in two days. Lagny fell almost as quickly.

"If my judgment is sound," Lanyard said, "this noble vessel will soon need a new commander." "True. Quite true." The Prussian placed two aluminium cups upon the table and half filled one with brandy, then brimmed it with champagne. "Try that," he said thickly, "That will keep your tail up, my friend." "Many thanks," Lanyard protested, filling another cup with undiluted champagne.

Oh, you are too amiable to admit it. I am sure you noticed it, for no one in town has such champagne as you." He licked his lips with reminiscent satisfaction. "No, I assure you, I am not flattering you. One of my cloth! How dare you charge me with it!" he laughed. "I have said as much to Mrs. Yorke. You ask her if I haven't." "How is your uncle's health?" inquired Mrs. Nailor.

At dawn on that eventful September morning an officer had ridden up to the town hall, called for the mayor or his representative, and on Monsieur Duguey's appearance, had demanded so much fodder for the horses, so much champagne for the officers, and Charles Huard!

There's cold pheasant and peas and new potatoes." I pulled out the bottle of champagne from my pocket. "If they're as new as this wine," I observed, "they ought to be delicious." Joyce accepted my contribution, and after reading the label, placed it carefully on the floor of the well. "Sarcon et fils," she repeated. "I always thought they made vinegar." "Perhaps they do," I replied.