When the champions are gude I can manish twa load i' the day fine, an' if the disease keeps oot amon' them, they pey no that ill." Meg's man gey a kind o' a whistle in laich, an' I saw fine syne whaur he had tint himsel'. Meg had tell'd him Sandy was a tattie merchant, an' he'd been thinkin' Sandy had a big wey o' doin', an' sell'd tatties in shiploads an' so on.

I pet them on mibby to rin an errand or twa, till they get the set o' my fit, an' syne I can manish them to the kirk. But I canna sit wi' noo buits; they're that uneasy. I got a noo pair lest Fursday, an' tried them on on Sabbath mornin'. But na, na!

'Me manish it! exclaimed the woman, her hopes again rising at the sound; 'me manish it! how d'ye think I'm to manish sich things? asked she. 'Why, get at the cook, or the housekeeper, or somebody, replied Mr. Sponge. 'Cook or housekeeper! exclaimed she. 'There'll be no cook or housekeeper astir here these many hours yet; I question, added she, 'they get up to-day.

"Ow, weel-a-weel," says Sandy, gey dour-like he's as bucksturdie as a mule when he tak's't in's heid "but we're no' deid yet, an' we'll mibby manish to garr some fowk winder yet, when a's dune. What's been dune afore can be dune again; the speerit o' Bannockburn's no' de'ed oot a'thegither." But I left the cratur chatterin' awa' till himsel', an' ran but to sair some fowk i' the shop.

"I think we'll better lave ower the rest o' the meetin' till anither nicht," said Moses Certricht, "an' we can look into the toon's midden some ither time." "Juist tak' a look roond aboot ye," says I, in at the winda, "an' ye'll see midden eneuch. Wha's genna clean up that mairter? I paws for a answer," says I, in a voice as like Sandy's bural-society wey o' speakin' as I cud manish.

I've thocht to mysel' that a' the men folk wud be, say, aboot thirty-five 'ear auld, or atween that an' forty, an' the weemin mibby fower or five 'ear younger." "An' wud they be a' ae size, d'ye think?" says Stumpie Mertin. Stumpie's a tailor, ye see, an' I suppose he'd been winderin' aboot hoo he wud manish wi' the measurin'.

"Oh, but I'll manish that, Bawbie," says he, gey snappish-like; "but still a man wi' brains in's heid canna juist be setisfeed wi' saft soap an' black lead a'thegither." "Ow weel," says I, "you wud mibby fa' in wi' a fell lot o' baith o' them, even i' the Toon Cooncil.

Further, he discussed the duties relating to the religious law and these have reference to the movements of man. He divided them into three parts Manish, Guyish and Kunish, meaning thereby belief, speech, and act, and these comprehended all the duties. When in this a man is wanting he is out of obedience and out of creed.

"Ay weel, Sandy," says I, "gin ye get on wi' your magic lantern as weel's ye generally manish wi' the washin' machine, when I'm needin' a hand o' ye, I'll swag Dauvid's bairns 'ill no' be lang keepit." "Tach, Bawbie, you're aye takin' fowk aff wi' your impidence," says Sandy, gey ill-natured like. But Dauvid an' Bandy juist took a bit lauch at him.

'Now, said he, stooping again, 'I think we may manish ye'; and he took the roll in his arms and hoisted it on to Hercules, whom he meant to make the led horse, observing aloud, as he adjusted it on the saddle, and whacked it well with his hands to make it lie right, 'I wish it was old Jog wouldn't I sarve him out! He then turned his horses round in their stalls, tucked his greasy jacket under the flap of the saddle-bags, took his ash-stick from the crook, and led them out of the capacious door.