'How de-licious this is! cried the untravelled Matilda, as they stepped upon the deck of the 'Lafayette, and she sniffed the shippy fragrance that caused Lavinia to gasp and answer darkly, 'Wait till to-morrow.

"Not till two o'clock," sighed the girl. "I wish," decided Felicia whimsically, "that Margot had cooked de-licious foods for us broiled chicken and baked potatoes and a caramel custard and that we could go and sit by the Bowling Green and have Bele bring our lunch out on the little folding table for you have been most kind to me " The girl stared after her in amazement.

"Oh, it hurts a little," declared Johnnie, "but I don't mind. Say, how's the cross horse?" One half of the apple scraped, Johnnie ate the red shell of it. "And have y' been to the rest'rant again? And I s'pose all them white-dressed men and ladies, they can eat all they want to of ev'ry kind of de-licious things!" One-Eye 'lowed they could.

"Oh, I'm going there, sir, and I shall see him." "One moment, Duchess; half a glass, please. I feel like a volcanic cinder. As you say, my lad de-licious," he continued, as he handed back the glass. "I am proud of that water, and so you ought to be." "I am, Doctor." "That's all due to me, sir.

"But you get off home; I'm not tired yet, and I'll walk." Sam said 'e wasn't very tired, and he walked along wondering whether Mr. Goodman was quite right in his 'ead. For one thing, 'e seemed upset about something or other, and kept taking little peeps at 'im in a way he couldn't understand at all. "It was nice tea we 'ad this arternoon," ses Mr. Goodman at last. "De-licious," ses Sam.

"But you get off home; I'm not tired yet, and I'll walk." Sam said 'e wasn't very tired, and he walked along wondering whether Mr. Goodman was quite right in his 'ead. For one thing, 'e seemed upset about something or other, and kept taking little peeps at 'im in a way he couldn't understand at all. "It was nice tea we 'ad this arternoon," ses Mr. Goodman at last. "De-licious," ses Sam.

She was at the door before Marjorie reached it, ready to spring into her arms and to exclaim how glad she was that she had come. "You begin to look too soon, Kitten." "I didn't begin till one o'clock," she said convincingly. "But I don't leave school till five minutes past two, childie." "But I have something to tell you to-day. Something de-licious. Aunt Prue has gone away with Morris.

I will have the next glass." "No, sir, please," said the woman firmly. "You want it worse than I do." "Don't waste time," said the Doctor sternly. "Drink the water, my lad." The deliciously cool draught trickled down Archie's throat till the bottom of the glass became top. "De-licious," he said.

We ate calves' brains for dinner, and what I'm sure were frogs' legs with mushrooms. You know we vowed we wouldn't touch their horrid messes, but I really begin to like them, confessed Mat, who had pronounced every dish at dinner 'De-licious!

I didn't mean that. I wasn't thinking of mou eggs for an instant. I mean salt. Won't you have some sa sweets? I wish Mamma would come. By Jove! She doesn't look half bad when she colours up like that. MISS T. No, I made these myself. What are they like? CAPT. G. These! De-licious. How d'you make them? I can't get my khansamah to understand the simplest thing beyond mutton and fowl. MISS T. Yes?