In two months' time Carl Rubach was restored to his old place at the Garrick, and poor Christopher was beginning to find out in real earnest what it was to be hungry. He was too proud to ask anybody for a loan, and Rubach was the only man he really knew. 'When things are at their worst, says the cynical bard, 'they sometimes mend. Things suddenly mended for Christopher.

President Wood was speaking. "Is there any one else? Stand up, if there is. No one else? Instantly a swirl of men surrounded Carl, questioning: "What j' do it for? Why didn't you keep still?" He pushed out through them. He sat blind through the first-hour quiz in physics, with the whole class watching him. The thought of the Turk's failure to rise kept unhappy vigil in his mind.

Oh, Carl, will you ever forget the time you and I ran away when we were just babies?" Carl: "I'll never forget " Mrs. Cowles: "I'll never forget that time! My lands! I thought I should die, I was so frightened." Carl: "You've forgiven me now, though, haven't you?" Mrs. Cowles: "My dear boy, of course I have!" Carl crossed the room and kissed her pale-veined, silvery old hand.

Then without pause or warning it swung dramatically into a stirring melody of power and dignity. The wretched man by the table buried his face in his hands and groaned. "Ah!" said Carl softly. "So Monsieur has heard that tune before? That in itself is illuminating." With a leer Hunch entered and deposited a tray upon the table.

"You can come home with me," he said, "and I will consider the matter." "Thank you, sir," said Carl, gladly. "I have got to make a call at the next house, not on business, though. There is an old schoolmate lying there sick. I am afraid he is rather poor, too. You can walk on slowly, and I will overtake you in a few minutes." "Thank you, sir."

It so chanced that, on one particular afternoon, the maid, either through awkwardness, or possibly through looking more at the handsome painter than the ground she was walking on, stumbled and fell. Of course, the basket fell, too, and equally of course, Carl, as a gentleman, could not do less than offer his assistance in picking up the damsel and the dinner.

At Hanover, he and Caroline were both prostrated, and could not join in the concert planned. On the road to Bremen, the postilion fell asleep and the coach was overturned into the ditch. The driver was stunned and the sick Carl had himself to revive the man, untie the baggage from the roof, unharness the horses, put everything in place again, and drive the postilion to the next station.

I shall have to pay her doctor's bill and also something more at least fifteen or twenty dollars." Mr. Dudder sighed at the thought of parting with so much cash. "I shall take the amount out of your spending money, and out of the money I was going to give you for Christmas" "Can't I have the five dollars you promised me for Christmas?" gasped Carl. "Not a cent of it."

I was very careless to put it loose in my pocket." "You were rather careless, sir." "Of what denomination is it? "It is a two-dollar note." "If you had been a poor boy," said the little man, eying Carl keenly, "you might have been tempted to keep it. I might not have known." Carl smiled. "What makes you think I am not a poor boy?" he said. "You are well dressed."

Things were very monotonous about this time and nothing particular occurred until the beginning of the second moon. By this time Her Majesty was quite sick of staying in the Forbidden City and said that no matter what happened she would remove the Court to the Sea Palace, where Miss Carl could get along and finish the portrait which had been hanging on for nearly a year.