Jones asked after Edith, and was told that she was away in Headford. She had walked into town to call on Mrs. Armstrong, with a view of getting a few articles which Mrs. Armstrong had promised to buy for her. Such was the story as given to Mr. Jones, and fully believed by him; but the reader may be permitted to think that the young lady was not anxious to meet the young gentleman. "Ada," said Mr.

"There are many who strive to enter, who shall not be able. How may one be assured of safety?" "There is a justification by faith. Hast thou never tasted of its sweetness?" "Alas! no," exclaimed Armstrong. "I have prayed for it, and longed for it in vain. The threatenings of the Gospel and not its promises are mine."

"I shall send John up early," said Helen, "that he may carry her parcel, and take care of her, for it gets soon dark at this time of the year." "That will do nicely," said Mrs. Scott; "I was just thinking how unlucky it was her father was not at home to-day; he is gone down as far as Canonby this morning, and it will be late before he returns." Mr. Martin had settled with Mr. Armstrong, that Mrs.

This was nothing less than the looting of the bank's securities, turning them into money, and making his escape. But the law has long arms. Paul Armstrong evidently studied the situation carefully. Just as the only good Indian is a dead Indian, so the only safe defaulter is a dead defaulter.

It was well this man was a man of iron and master of himself, or he might have flagged under this new effort, with the distressing prospect awaiting him at his journey's end. As it was, he urged doggedly forward, forgetful of the existence of such an individual as Frank Armstrong, and dwelling only on the dying man behind and the mourners ahead.

Two Maxims were destroyed and an Armstrong was taken along with us. What havoc was played in that brief quarter of an hour! The wounded mules, horses and men lay groaning side by side. Colonel Murray, Captain Murray, and almost all the other officers, fell in the action, and several privates passed into the unseen world that fatal night.

The programme was half over, and Tom was repairing the ravages of nature with a bun, when Mr Armstrong became suddenly aware of a person in the row but one in front looking round fixedly in his direction.

I nodded; I had no breath for speech. "This man tells me," continued Mr. Armstrong, "that just a few minutes previous to the time the whole household was aroused last night he heard a step in the hall overhead, then the sound of a light foot descending the little staircase in the servants' hall.

The funeral services were to be held on Tuesday, and the interment of the body was to be deferred until the Armstrongs arrived from California. No one, I think, was very sorry that Arnold Armstrong was dead, but the manner of his death aroused some sympathy and an enormous amount of curiosity. Mrs.

"A most urgent telegram was dispatched to you from London by Godfrey Staunton at six-fifteen yesterday evening a telegram which is undoubtedly associated with his disappearance and yet you have not had it. It is most culpable. I shall certainly go down to the office here and register a complaint." Dr. Leslie Armstrong sprang up from behind his desk, and his dark face was crimson with fury.