This was carried to such a length, and he was so eloquent on the subject that the police were desired to interfere, and he was made to hold his tongue, at any rate as far as England and Ireland were concerned. He had made Galway a kind of centre home, attracted thither by the friendship which his daughter had made with Ada and Edith Jones.

"Oh, do not leave me, my mistress," exclaimed Marianna, clinging to her dress. "You will be killed, to a certainty, if you go up among all the fighting. No, you shall not go!" Ada did not attempt to disengage herself, for she remembered her promise to Colonel Gauntlett, and she felt how worse than useless she would there be.

Every one on board the Ione prayed for a fair wind, and plenty of it, to carry them along rapidly to the scene of their operations. The officers, who could but sympathise with their captain from having known Ada Garden, were, of course, the most eager, and never, perhaps, were a set of men collected better able to aid in accomplishing the same object.

After her dress was arranged she went to the table for her old white gloves, the cleaning of which had cost her much trouble, for her mother did not seem to be at all interested in them, so Ada did as well as she could. As she was about to put them on her mother returned from a drawer, into the recesses of which she had been diving, and from which she brought a paper carefully folded.

Acting then on this idea merely because Ada had been beautiful she had gone to work, and this had come of it! In that minute that was allowed to her as the boiled mutton was cooling on the dresser beneath her hand, all this passed through her mind. "Wrong done by me to Ada!" said the Captain. "I have said it; but if you are a gentleman you will forget it.

'So she is; and that makes it all the more trying to be treated like the Grand Inquisitor. 'Shall I speak to her? She is always as pleasant as possible with me. 'Oh no, don't. It would only make it worse, and prevent you from having her confidence. 'Ah, Jane, I have often thought your one want was gentleness, said Miss Ada, with the gesture of her childhood -her head a little on one side.

They shared their apples and gingerbread with me, and brought me goodies on a plate sometimes so that I might eat my dinner, they said, 'like the rest of the folks, I fetched them to and from school, and trotted every day to the post-office and the Corners to do the family errands; and when our Ada was old enough to be trusted to drive, the whole lot of them would pile into the carryall, and away we would go for a long ride, through the lanes and the shady woods that border the pond, stopping a dozen times for the girls to clamber out and pick the wild posies and for the boys to skip stones or wade in the water.

The women, although sympathetic, were puzzled by some of his remarks, and therefore sat in silence for a little, but presently the volatile Ada looked up and said "What thinkest thou, Hilda, in regard to war?" "I know not what to think," replied Hilda. "Nay, then, thy spirit must be flying from thee, for thou wert not wont to be without an opinion on most things.

She could hitch up a team and drive it like a man. There was only one drawback to Ada. On Saturday when we were busiest she went home and to church; and on Sunday she hung out the washing. Ada was a loyal Adventist. Settlers meeting on the trail hailed one another with "Hello! Where you from? I'm from Illinois" or Virginia or Iowa. "You breakin'?" They had no time for backgrounds.

Within one week I had picked up wonderfully. At the end of that week Ada and I were quite chummy. She asked me one day if I were married. No. Was she? “You don't think I'd be working like this if I was, do you?” When I asked her what she would be doing if she didn't have to work, she answered, “Oh, lots of things.” Nor could I pin her to details.