It had no light, it had no depth. It was like the disquisition of a debating society. He was distressed by a fancy of an old German couple, spectacled and peering, puzzled by his letter. Perhaps they would be obscurely hurt by his perplexing generalisations. Why, they would ask, should this Englishman preach to them? He sat back in his chair wearily, with his chin sunk upon his chest.

Yes, I shall be happy to assist you as far as I can. The first question is, where shall we go?" "That, I am sure, you know best." An interesting disquisition ensued.

I cannot conclude this long disquisition better than with a caution derived from the words of inspirationDiscern the things of your peace now in the days thereof, before they be hidden from your eyes. Agrippa, XI. For the Massachusetts Gazette. My last address contained the outlines of a system fully adequate to all the useful purposes of the union.

There was also much disquisition on the subject of finance the Advocate observing that the States now raised as much in a month as the Provinces in the time of the Emperor used to levy in a year and expressed the hope that the Queen would increase her contingent to ten thousand foot, and two thousand horse.

The Doctor could have gone into a long disquisition about Presbyterian Orders, contradicting the arguments many good and devout people adduced in favour of them, but there was little time, so he only confirmed with authority Stead's belief that a Bishop's Ordination was indispensable to a true pastor, "the only door by which to enter to the charge of the fold."

But evidently the girl was not interested by his praise of the art-life of European capitals or their historical associations; she cut short his disquisition: "See here! When I first seed you an' knew you was raised in Boston, an' had lived in New York, I jest thought you no account for comin' to this jumpin'-off place.

The Advocate then went into an historical and critical disquisition, into which we certainly have no need to follow him, rapidly examining the whole subject of predestination and conditional and unconditional damnation from the days of St.

This paper, which was taken as read, consists of a lengthy theoretical disquisition, in which the author maintains the following propositions: That the combining weights of all elements are one third of their present values; the assumption that equal volumes of gases contain equal numbers of molecules does not hold good; that the present theory of valency is not supported by chemical facts, and that its elimination would be no small gain for chemistry in freeing it of an element full of mystery, uncertainty, and complication; that the distinction between atoms and molecules will no longer be necessary; that the facts of specific heat do not lend any support to the theory of valency.

Frank Harris, in a general disquisition to the table, at last turned to Arthur Balfour and said, with an air of finality: "The fact is, Mr. Balfour, all the faults of the age come from Christianity and journalism." To which Arthur replied with rapier quickness and a child-like air: "Christianity, of course ... but why journalism?"

Your first glass of hermitage is the algebraic sign for five-and-thirty, the glorious burst is over; the pace is still good, to be sure, but the great enthusiasm is past. You can afford to look forward, but confound it, you've along way to look back also." "I say, Charley, our friend has contrived to finish the bishop during his disquisition; the bowl's quite empty." "You don't say so, Fred.