But Bellward had grasped the dancer by the two arms and forced her up the stairs in front of him. Nur-el-Din seemed too overcome with terror to utter a sound. "Oh, don't be so rough with her, Major Okewood!" entreated Barbara, "you'll hurt her!" She had her back turned to Strangwise so she missed the very remarkable change that came over his features at her words.

But when Wolf's gaze wandered so intently from the tower to the bow-window, and from the bow-window to the great entrance door, it was by no means from pleasure or interest in the exterior of the Golden Cross, but because Barbara had confessed that the nineteen-year-old owner of the edifice, who was still a minor, was also wooing her.

Waddington coming through his dressing-room and Barbara had run away by the door into the corridor. "Who took those things out of my wardrobe?" he said. He was gazing, dreamily, affectionately almost, at the pyjamas. "I did." "And what for?" "To look at them. Can you wonder? Horatio, if you wear them I'll apply for a separation." "You needn't worry."

While lying at Santa Barbara, we encountered another south-easter; and, like the first, it came on in the night; the great black clouds coming round from the southward, covering the mountain, and hanging down over the town, appearing almost to rest upon the roofs of the houses.

I dined with Colonel Waring and Agnes to-night, as you know." Barbara had uncovered her eyes to hold the tumbler; but she set it on the floor, as he began to speak, and shielded her face. "H-how is he?" she asked. "He gets tired rather quickly, but otherwise he's all right. Leading quite a normal life, I mean."

I could eat you up for one thing without turning a hair, and that would be wicked." "It wouldn't," Barbara laughed. "It would be greedy. My new model has the face of a man who has never stopped at anything that has stood in his way. I fancy that he has murders up his sleeve and every other crime in the calendar.

They were running out of the Square when Fanny remembered and cried out, "Oh, stop him, Horatio. We must go back and see if Ralph's coming to dinner." But at the White Hart they were told that Mr. Bevan had "gone to Oxford on his motor-bike" and was not expected to return before ten o'clock. "Sorry, Barbara." "I don't see why you should apologize to Miss Madden, my dear.

In truth he was not thinking much of the sea, but of Barbara. It was plain that she was in trouble of some kind. And the notion that Babs could find trouble in life was extraordinarily queer; for he felt, subconsciously, what a great driving force of disturbance was necessary to penetrate the hundred folds of the luxurious cloak enwrapping one so young and fortunate.

Barbara arranged to go out to meet him as far as Lornton Inn the spot between the Forest and the Chase at which he had waited for night on the evening of their elopement.

As for the hands she has fallen into, what do I know of them? They may be black with sin for all I can tell. No doubt Barbara Ballantree's daughter would be just as ready to accept help from such hands." "As a painter, I try to keep mine clean," said Somerled. "I tell you that in earnest, not in joke, because for the present I've constituted myself your granddaughter's guardian.