Bixby and other minor politicians who copied him. And usually the other man played directly into Jethro's hands. Jake Wheeler always did, and now, to cover the awkwardness of the silence, he began on the Brampton celebration. "They tell me Heth Sutton's a-goin' to make the address seems prouder than ever sence he went to Congress. I guess you'll tell him what to say when the time comes, Jethro."

Mitchell had gone to work again; she had herself made a summer mantle for one of Miss Sutton's friends, and had been paid four and sixpence for it. Albert had got a rise of a shilling a-week; and baby's cheeks were getting to have quite a colour. Mrs. Mitchell was sure that Juliet was very good and very happy, and making herself useful to her aunt and uncle.

Sutton, and his only sister, Mabel, did the honors of his home in his stead, and, if the truth must be admittbd, more acceptably to their guests than he had ever succeeded in doing. For a week past, the house had been tolerably well filled ditto Mrs. Sutton's hands; ditto her great, heart.

Drake's Duster , Sir Richard Sutton's Dryden , the Duke of Rutland's Senator , Duke of Rutland's Weathergage , the Earl of Coventry's Rambler , Mr. E. P. Rawnsley's Freeman , and the Grafton Woodman . Breeding Foxhounds is one of the most fascinating of all the pleasures of animal culture, as the above list, so full of extreme merit, can be traced for nearly a hundred and thirty years.

Bixby and other minor politicians who copied him. And usually the other man played directly into Jethro's hands. Jake Wheeler always did, and now, to cover the awkwardness of the silence, he began on the Brampton celebration. "They tell me Heth Sutton's a-goin' to make the address seems prouder than ever sence he went to Congress. I guess you'll tell him what to say when the time comes, Jethro."

The oration began with a lengthy tribute to the resources and history of his state, and ended by a declaration that the speaker was in Congress at no man's bidding, but as the servant of the common people of his district. Sutton's speech. There were four columns of it, but Jethro seemed to take delight in every word; and portions of the noblest parts of it, indeed, he had Cynthia read over again.

Some of the incidental details given are such as no fabricator would insert. In the MS., "How to discover a witch," Brit. Mus., Add. MSS., 36,674, f. 148, there is a reference to a detail of Mother Sutton's ordeal not given in the pamphlet I have used.

A soldier came out of the house with the narrow shutters, wounded, limping, his foot bound to a splint. Then Sutton came, hurrying to help him. He shouted to her, "Come on, Charlotte, hurry up!" and she called back, "I've got to wait here for John." She watched them go on slowly up the road to Sutton's car; she saw them get in; she saw the car draw out and rush away.

"Well, we've no call to be ashamed," said Mr. Pullet, "for Doctor Turnbull hasn't got such another patient as you i' this parish, now old Mrs. Sutton's gone." "Pullet keeps all my physic-bottles, did you know, Bessy?" said Mrs. Pullet. "He won't have one sold. He says it's nothing but right folks should see 'em when I'm gone.

"Best thing you can give him," Sutton said. He got up and opened the doors for her, the glass doors and the door of the bedroom. She sat down beside John's bed and watched him while he drank Sutton's tea. He said he was all right now. No. He hadn't ruptured anything; he only thought he had; but Sutton had overhauled him and said he was all right.