Phoebicius ended his prayer to-day a prayer for strength to break his wife's strong spirit, for a successful issue to his revenge on her seducer ended it without haste, and with careful observance of all the prescribed forms.

Phoebicius had no mind to listen to any speech from Polykarp's mother, but her question suggested to him for the first time a rapid retrospect of all that had occurred, and he could not conceal from himself that his suspicions rested on weak grounds.

He shook the door that closed in the homestead, and found it locked; the watch-dogs roused themselves, and gave tongue, when Phoebicius turned to Petrus' house, and began to knock at the door with the brazen knocker, at first softly and then with growing anger; he considered it as certain that his wife had sought and found protection under the senator's roof.

"If you lay a finger on me, I will call for help, and Dorothea and her husband will protect me against you." "Hardly," answered Phoebicius drily. "It would suit you no doubt to find yourself under the same roof as that great boy who brings you colored glass, and throws roses into your window, and perhaps has strewed the road with them by which he found his way to you to-day.

Phoebicius did not doubt that the woman who had joined the caravan which he himself had seen yesterday was his fugitive wife, and he knew that his delay might have reduced his earnest wish to overtake her and punish her to the remotest probability; but he was a Roman soldier, and would rather have laid violent hands on himself than have left his post without a deputy.

Phoebicius ended his prayer to-day a prayer for strength to break his wife's strong spirit, for a successful issue to his revenge on her seducer ended it without haste, and with careful observance of all the prescribed forms.

Paulus recollected the enquiry which Phoebicius lead addressed to the Amalekite as to a greyhound, and he immediately guessed that the Gaul's runaway wife must be not far off. His heart beat more quickly, and although he did not immediately know how he should meet the disloyal wife, he felt himself impelled to go to seek her.

Twenty slaves, many camels, and even two horses belonged to him, and the centurion in command of the Imperial garrison, the Gaul Phoebicius, and his wife Sirona, lived as lodgers under his roof; not quite to the satisfaction of the councillor, for the centurion was no Christian, but a worshipper of Mithras, in whose mysteries the wild Gaul had risen to the grade of a 'Lion, whence his people, and with them the Pharanites in general, were wont to speak of him as "the Lion."

Sirona is mine, as the sun and moon and stars are mine, because they shed a beautiful light on my murky path. My life is mine and she was the life of my life, and therefore I say boldly, and would say, if there were twenty such as Phoebicius here, she belongs to me.

"I know the sound Phoebicius is coming this way." "He is doing his duty," replied Paulus. "And still, one thing more. I saw last night a ring on your hand an onyx." "There it lies," said Sirona; and she pointed to the farthest corner of the cave, where it lay on the dusty soil.