Diana insisted, first with warmth, and then with an eloquence that startled her companion, that for an Englishwoman to be brought up outside England, away from country and countrymen, was to waste and forego a hundred precious things that might have been gathered up. "I used to be ashamed when I talked to English people. Not that we saw many.

Perhaps, had she known how the subtle Farnese was about to express himself concerning the fast-approaching execution of Mary, and the as inevitably impending destruction of "that Englishwoman" through the schemes of his master and himself, she would have paid less heed to the sentiments couched in most exquisite Italian which Alexander was at the same time whispering in her ear, and would have taken less offence at the blunt language of the States-General.

He thought of her all day long. The farce of pity was ended. He knew now that he loved this Englishwoman with an affection at once foolish and sinful, foolish, since he knew not who or what this woman was; sinful, since the indulgence of this passion involved the forfeiture of his plighted word, the disappointment of those who loved him.

These last had as a rule torn themselves away from her, leaving hearts, or other fragments of themselves, behind, and were not to be cajoled back again, even by one of her little gilt-edged notes. But the duke did not break away. He had selected her, she pleased him, he desired to marry an Englishwoman. He had the approval of Lady Bellairs.

Standing thus in repose, and yet keenly observant, was Florence Nightingale that Englishwoman whose name shall never die, but sound like music on the lips of British men until the hour of doom. Naturally Florence Nightingale was interested in the woman who came to her warmly recommended by British medical officers, and made many enquiries concerning her intentions.

"Then mademoiselle shall ride my little barb; there is hardly such a horse anywhere, mademoiselle, so docile, so sweet-tempered, and so sure-footed. It is not every lady I would trust with my little horse; but I know how an Englishwoman can sit in the saddle, and I am proud to offer it to mademoiselle." "Je vous remercie bien, monsieur." Then the Capitaine talked of Christmas-day.

She was quite an old woman an Englishwoman and as she placed the lamps upon the table she scrutinised the guest after the manner of a privileged servitor. When she had departed Jack Meredith continued his narrative with a sort of deliberation which was explained later on. "And," he said, "that is why I came to Africa that is why I want to make money.

Amidst all this joy the Lady Winifred of Aescendune stood upon the steps of the great hall to receive her lord, fair as the lily, a true Englishwoman, a loving wife and tender mother. And by her, one on each side, stood her two children, Wilfred and Edith.

I did fear you might have some prejudices. But here we are at the farmyard." "Burn the farmyard! How can I think of farmyards when you talk of Frank's marriage? Come on this way. What were you saying about prejudices?" "Why, you might wish him to marry an Englishwoman, for instance." "English! Good heavens, sir, does he mean to marry a Hindoo?"

"But while I was studying in France, one lion-hearted Englishwoman was moving our native isle. First she tried the University of London; and that sets up for a liberal foundation. Answer 'Our charter is expressly framed to exclude women from medical instruction. "Then she sat down to besiege Edinburgh. Now, Edinburgh is a very remarkable place.